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Uprated Toe Links

One of the things that I did not get round to was the replacement of the original toe links. After doing some research, there seem to be a general consensus that with the added power and on-track activities, it is advisable to upgrade the OEM toe links.   Having said that, perhaps if your car is only used for the road and they toe links are in good shape, I personally do not see why there would be a need to have them changed. As it happens, mine were completely shot to bits!   If you look carefully on this one, you can see that the main bar is definitely bent...     And this one seems to have had some pretty strong mole grips on it at some point that ended up denting the bar. If you look carefully, the centre of the toe link bar is definitely 'pinched' in such a way that it has created a weak point.     Given the above, it would be suicidal not to change them at this point.   Options   There are currently various options available in the market, the main ones being, Elise Parts, Elise Shop, Spitfire Engineering (not sure whether or not these are the ones being sold at Elise Shop) and now Nitrons. They all vary in price, design, structure and I guess to certain extent, quality. Doing my research, it was apparent that they are all well regarded and work as required and perhaps cost is the key decider.   So what did I go for? Well, none of the above   I am of the opinion that the more options we have in market, the better it is for us owners and introducing these options, it sometimes requires taking a chance. I am also a sucker for trying something new For that reason, I decided to try the kit supplied by Hot Laps.   There has been all sorts of discussions on this kit, but to my mind I rather try them myself and decide from there. After placing my order with Elgan (a thoroughly nice chap at Hot Laps), the kit duly arrived. I must say, my first impression of the kit is that they are very well made and really feel like a quality product.     Some closer details...     In the end, I opted to have Hot-Laps install the toe links for me and after picking up my car during the week, it was duly return just a couple of days later, donning its new bits .         Unfortunately due to bad whether, I am yet to really try them, but for what I see, I am very impressed and happy with my purchase. I am told that there will be a number of upgrades coming up, but for now the offering is pretty good.   As for this particular job, I can call it job done!  

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mambosasa

 

Gearbox Oil Change

Since about 1000 miles, I have been hearing rather strange grinding noises from the gearbox, when I lift off. This seemed to get louder once the car really warms up. So, I decided to change the gearbox oil and go for something a little different.   Preparation   1. I removed the rear near-side wheel and left the car up on jacks.     2. I removed the diffuser and loosen up the centre undertray. This provided adequate access to the bolts required to drain the oil.     Draining   1. I removed the lower bolt as shown on the photo. Note that you will have to use a ratchet handle to remove this bolt.     When you do this, don't forget to place a catch tray under the car   2. In ensuring that gearbox is fully drained, I had to lower the car on the jacks to level. I left the car to drain for about ten minutes.   3. Once completely drained, I replaced the bolt.   TIP: Replace all washers in ensuring that you don't get leaks at a later date. These can be bought from Honda parts department.   Refilling   1. I then removed the top bolt. Doing this will do two things. Firstly, the outlet will act as a 'level' when re-filling the gearbox. Once oil comes out of this hole during re-filling process, then you have reached the correct amount. Note that the car must be level to ensure that you have required amount of oil in the gearbox. Secondly, it will act as a breather hole to allow oil to flow.     (note the square holed drain plug - bolted back in place)   2. Now I now that some folks use this hole to refill the gearbox, however I decided to use the inlet hole at the top of the casing (by the gear linkage). I used a pipe and a funnel that worked a treat.       3. Just over 2L later, the oil dripped out of the top hole. I replaced the bolt, the undertray and the wheel and removed the jack.   4. I went for the Amsoil transmission synthetic oil. As you can see, two bottles and a bit was good enough to fill the gearbox.     Drive   I went for a quick drive and once the car was warm, the gear changes were beautiful and smooth. The grinding noise was reduced dramatically, but I will have to drive a bit more to be sure by how much. But for now, I am happy and I can consider this job done!

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First Service

I can't believe that it's already time for a service. It really feels like only yesterday that the car was finished and back on the road.   Now, I always anticipated that my first service will take a bit longer than normal, mainly due to the fact that the location of the oil filter is not easily accessible and I would have to work out the best way of getting to it.   So, the ingredients.   Silkoline Pro S 5-40 Fram Oil Filter (PH4998) A couple of jacks Ramps A selection of tools for the removal of the undertray and a plug remover. Undertray Removal   So, first thing is first as they say. With this particular Honda conversion, the oil filter is located to the right of the engine bay and just under the subframe. Although this removed the need to cut the sub-frame, as required by some other conversions, it does present a bit of access issue.   The only other feasible way of getting to the oil filter would be from under the car.   So, the first job is to get the car backed up onto the ramps. I must admit, I have done this several times, but I just can't get used to it.   Well, after lining up the ramps, I had my 'little' Bro backing me up and place the car on the ramps.     Then it was a matter of removing the rear diffuser and the centre undertray section. This gave me ample access to the whole of the engine from under the car.   Prep work   To gain better access to the oil filter, I removed the bolts for the two underside steady arms to allow me to rock the engine to give a little bit more access room.       Once the bolts were out, I was able to move the engine by about half an inch. It doesn't sound a lot, but this game me enough room to stick my hands through either side of the far side drive shaft subframe holes and just about get hold of the oil filter.   After a bit of strength work, I was able to twist the oil filter loose by hand.   TIP:- Drain the oil first before undoing the oil filter. This will prevent you receiving a face full of aged Pro S . Note that the only reason for me taking this approach this time round was that I was unsure as to whether or not I was going to be able to remove the oil filter. I needed the option of aborting the whole thing if I failed.   After the oil filter was out of the way, I then removed the filler cap and the drain plug. Be careful where you place the collection pan. I was surprised just how far out the oil shot out and it almost missed the pan.   After a bit of research, it turned out that there a number of viable options when it comes to oil filters. I wanted something that was shorter than what I had previously, so I went for this...       Once the engine was completely drained, it was a very simple exercise to hand tight the new oil filter in place (don't forget to oil the rubber seal on the filter) and put everything back in place.     Once it the engine received a container full of golden Pro S, I checked all the plugs ( always give them a quick clean), then the car was back to her good self.   The engine sounded even sweater than ever!!     Next time, I think I would be able to get the work done a lot faster and perhaps get away without having to remove the steady arms. I will keep you posted.   For now though, it's job done! My 'little' Bro helping out (visiting from States)

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8 Months Of Lotus Fun

I've had my Elise for 8 months now and am up to about 5,800 miles. Its still going really well and I feel very comfortable that it will not bite me unless I do something really stupid!   Had a new hood under warranty a few weeks ago and they sorted a brake recall at the same time. My nearest dealer is in Leicester, 40 miles from work, which is a pain though.   Still not done a track day yet, I guess that will have to be next year now.   The car gets loads of nice comments from all sorts of people and unlike my TT, people will let me out of junctions!   Had to call AA out the other day. My mate's knee had somehow knocked the hazard flashers and jammed the button, so the indicators stopped working. Took the AA man all of 30 secs to sort.   Been reading the Best of Evo mag that has just been published. I like the way they say the Veyron and Zonda handle like an Elise

Martin G

Martin G

 

Oil Catch Tank

Catch tank installation is one of those items that seem to attract a great deal of debate as of its benefits. If you search around on the internet, there is a great deal of information and opinions.   As for me, its quite simple. The crank case needs venting somehow and I can see three ways of achieving that.   1. Pipe the outlet to somewhere out of the clam. This option is cheap, effective and will keep any oil blowouts way from the engine compartment. 2. Install a crank case vent filter direct on the outlet. This is what I had originally. Again, it is an effective method however there is a danger that if you do get an oil surge, the oil will cover the engine bay and possibly get on the manifold and catch fire.   Here is how I had it...     3. Installation of an oil catch tank. This is a very simple solution based on a tank that is installed between the crank outlet and the return connected onto the air inlet pipe.   Installation was quite straight forward. I opted to mount the catch tank on the mounting plate on the side of the engine bay and routed the pipes directly into it. No complications and a job that took less than 30 minutes to complete   I will run with it for six months and post an update.   I think it looks pretty good   Job done.  

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Dyno

The car has been running for a while using a very rough map given to me by Steve (Stormin Norman) on Seloc. Many thanks to him for all his help and advice - a very knowledgeable and helpful guy   Anyway, I decided to get the car booked in at WGT in Middlewitch for a dyno tune.     Pip, absolute top man, got working on the car. We had some initial connection issues, but that was resolved by updating the ECU management software and flashing the unit.   Pip worked his magic on the car for two - three hours, slowly refining the map...       So, what did we end up with...   Well, considering it was a pretty hot day, the car managed to deliver 214bhp at the hubs!! I was pretty happy with that.   The car now pulls like a train and the cams kick in at about 4600rpm just sends the car into orbit! Loveeellly!   Further report to follow once driven for a while, but for now its job done!

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My New Elise

After 2 years away from Lotus cars I have sold the Z4M- a great car- but having previously owned 4 Elises, I had to get back. I hope to collect my new SC on Tuesday 9th June after Carl has fitted Venture shield. I have had protective film fitted to 3 of my cars in the past and it's well worth it to keep the stone chips away, though you must get an experienced professional to fit it. I had to get my last car refitted a week later, as the result was very disappointing. Any way, I found Carl from a recommendation on this site so I am confident of a super job. Looking forward now to some great motoring!

Rick

Rick

 

Ecu Cover

When it comes to where to locate the ECU, for what I have seen it varies depending on who is doing the conversion. I have seen them in the cabin behind the seats, inside the wheel arch liner, in the boot and so on.   I decided to mount mine on exactly the same place as where the original one was. This was really driven by the fact that I wanted to ensure that all the original wiring could still reach and remove the any added complication with the loom make-up.   Another word - LAZY!   The only concern I had with this location is the proximity to the engine and the effect of the heat/ water may have on its operation. So after some head scratching, I decided to make up a cover with some of the Nimbus I had left.     I then marked up the sheet and measured the required dims...     Then it was simply a matter of cutting the shape out and rivet the lugs to hold it in place...     Trial fit and all seems fine...     Add some rubber edging to stop it from cutting through the wires     Push fit into location...     I think that will offer heat protection and keep water away from all the open ports. I am pretty happy with that and I can call that job done!

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Exhaust

As I mentioned before, I had an issue with the exhaust system not fitting correctly. This is still under investigation and I am sure that Stark will come up with a solution that is satifactory all round.   In the meantime, I had to get the car finished and back on the road and it was agreed that I would get the exhaust modified to suit, get it back on the road and then take it up to Stark to get it sorted out.   So, it was off to the local exhaust place for the work...     Tacking up for re-welding...     And all done. 2.5 inch (as preferred by N/A Hondas) and just a trim to finish it off.     It should be noted that I will eventually end up with a 2Bular or similar, but for now this will do nicely.   TIP: If your exhaust is short, as it is on mine, you will have to be careful not burn and blister your paint. Mine did! . Once the end trim was in place, the issue stopped.

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Back Again

It's been a couple of months of trouble free motoring in the Elise since my last blog. I've got into Twittering in the meantime (www.twitter.com/martingibbs)   Mileage now nearly up to 4,000, well and truly run in and nicely loosened up. Doing about 250 miles everytime before the fuel light comes on and then it takes about 35 litres to fill up, which is 32mpg.   We had a great day in the Peak District last weekend, blasting about on a Phil & Kirsty style property hunt. Had to keep the roof on though, but was pretty refined on the M1.   Yesterday was roof off all day, pottering around to parents. Today we went to a Christening near Dorridge. Roof off all day, sunshine and sunburn as well. One of those days you buy an Elise for.   I sent off the paperwork on Friday, so very soon I will have my private plate on the Elise.   Biggest problem at the moment is stone chips. Masses of them on the sills and chin. Driving me nuts. The paint just seems to fall off if the car so much as sees a bit of grit. Never had this problem with a car before. Getting good with touch up paint though.

Martin G

Martin G

 

Undertray Installation

It has been a while since I last updated the blog due to holiday and work commitments, but I finally managed to get some time with the car on Saturday.   As you know, I still have a number of minor issues that I am working my way through. I will document these in later entries.   For now, I have been keen to get the car bolted together and go for a drive!   Undertray modification   The Stack kit mounts the engine pretty low and as far forward as possible and because of this, the undertray has to be modified to ensure that it doesn't catch the bottom of the sump.   First job was to remove the off side naca duct by drilling out the rivets...     Then to aid cooling, cut two slits either side of the opening...     Then bend outwards to act as a scoop and ram more air in the space between the undertray and the engine.     Once that was done, I decided to reverse the car up the ramps (I couldn't be bothered to jack the car up) and started working on the installation. TIP: I used this opportunity to double check and spanner fixings, check for leaks or anything unexpected     After an hour or so, she started looking like her old self again...     Still unwashed and full of operation scars, but with a little TLC, she will hopefully be looking better than ever...     Still to do:-   1. Correct installation of the exhaust pipe (Some issues there) 2. Re-fit the wheelarch liners 3. Sort out my rev counter issue (revs not being displayed on the Stack)   So, getting there.   As for the undertray installation - its job done!

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Clam Installation

I couldn't wait any longer. The clam had to go back on.   So, I enlisted the help of Carlton X (of the VX220 family) and Jordy (a former MLOCer who sold his S1 following a miss-hap with his cat )   Anyway, the moved the car out of the garage - for only the second time since the conversion...     Great opportunity for the kids to jump up and down all over it. Are you having fun kids?     I guess so then   We first tried fitting the clam back on without taking off the wheels and it was a no go. So, it ended up on the jacks, with the wheels off and tried again.   TIP: It should be remembered that the clam has to be scooped on, by hooking up the rear first, then lower the front part down and push into place. Some clam damage (small paint cracks that is) should be expected here, unless you are really lucky.   After twenty minutes so jigging the clam about, it was on and in place.     Looking more and more like the I remembered her...   Now with the wheels back on too...     Looking the part!     The clam is held by 6 bolts for now, pending resolution of exhaust issue, but for now we can tick this as a job done!

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Engine Start

It has been a long journey to this point, but I am now ready to get the beast started!   I first checked over the wiring one more time, just to make sure that everything is where it should be.   TIP: Its advised that you should have a fire extinguisher at the ready just in case something goes wrong. I certainly had mine at the ready   I then connected up the battery and turned the ignition to the on position and run a visual and smell check to ensure that there is nothing unusual happening.   Since I went with the Hondata K-Pro option, I connected up my laptop running K-Manager and checked for any initial codes etc. So far, so good.     It was time to crank the engine!   Engine to on position, pressed the button. The engined turned over, but no spark. After a quick check with Alan, I discovered that there was a wire that needed to be connected to the 12V supply. After the quick modification, I tried again.   And with a loud bark, smoke and cough the beast was alive! Jonny 5 was indeed alive!   Here is a video of the start clicky This was an amazing experience, given the journey into the unknown.   It should be noted that when the engine is fired up for the first time, it will be running pretty lumpy and will smoke for a while.   So after all that, what do you think Son?     Thumbs up! Well, thats good enough for me Son.   What followed was a number of running the engine until the fan came on, bleeding the coolant system and checking for error codes and leaks.   She is now running pretty smoothly.

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Heat Shielding To Subframe

The kit comes with a sheet of Nimbus heat shielding, Stark also provide you with a template that can be used to cut the sheet out.   I personally used a combination of the template and measurements that I took myself, although I don't think this is absolutely necessary.   I used a marker pen to detail out the cutting lines and by using a tin cutter, traced out and removed the shape.     I also decided to create a cup to go over the toe link to give them a little bit more protection from the heat. This will only be secured on one side so that it can be bent out of the way for toe-link changes.     Pushed it into place for a quick check, before deciding where to drill for the rivets...     After I was happy with the location, I then drilled a number of holes to receive rivets and washers in securing the shielding into place. 30 Minutes later, I ended up with this...         I am pretty happy with that   One more job to do. Cut a little piece and secure it to on the engine bay side of the rear clam. I will bend this into place once the clam is back on the car. It will form a 'cup' over the exhaust manifold.     Happy with that. Job done!

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Wiring Loom

One element of this build that I did not look forward to was the electrics. Unfortunately there is no way round it and the car harness has to be modified to receive the Honda engine's loom.   At this point, I would like to give thanks to Alan Gourlay, who is currently doing the same conversion (posts on Seloc) who help me immensely in guiding me through the wiring loom modifications. To be even more precise, he provided me with his schematic drawings that I then used to create the 'new' loom. Alan is ex-Honda so his knowlege is exceptional.   The approach to modifying the wiring loom has to be read the wiring diagrams, understand them, read them again then start modifying one wire at a time. I can honestly say that over the three days that it took me to do this work, I had a headache from hell! But I got there in the end.   Original Loom   The first this to do is remove the original engine wiring loom from the Rover lump. At this point, its worth excepting that you will butcher it completely and it would never be used as it was originally intended again.     Once removed, the first thing to do is to remove the large connector that used to plug into the Rover ECU. This is just a matter of snipping off all the wires.   You should then be left with something like this.     Modifications   In essence, the idea here is to splice the loom just prepared into the connectors going into the Honda ECU. This includes the C101 (Large harnesss connector) and the E Connector going into the Honda ECU   Unfortunately, I do not currently have permission to post Alan's wiring diagram, if I do so in the future, I will post it up.   So, I spend three evenings working through the diagram step by step. Once I started at 7:30pm and did not leave the desk until 1:00 in the morning!   I work away, so I decided to spend my otherwise uninteresting evening at the Hotel making progress with the wiring...   All set to start     Hhhmmm! This is going to be a bit of a challenge...     The end result   After hours and hours, this is what I ended up with. Now, it should be noted at this point that although I am not completely clueless, I am not in any way an electrical engineer. So, if you are an experienced Electrician, then this work should be pretty straight forward for you.   This is what I got...     The main car harness plugs that would link the new Engine to the wiring loom to the front of the car.     Then it was just a matter of pluging everything back in and job done.   TIP: How well the wiring comes out will be done to your approach and time taken. Mine is okay, however I know full well if I cared a bit more, I could have done a better job of it. This would be by ensuring that all the wires are cut to length, all unused pins removed from the blugs and insulating all cables from potential heat damage. I would give mine 6 out of 10   But for what it is and for now, I can call this job done!

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Suspension & Drivetrain Continued

Once the drive shafts were sent back to me, it was time to get on with the rebuilding of the rear suspension assembly.   I must say, the installation of the driveshafts took far longer and was far more difficult than I anticipated.   TIP: Please, oh please ensure that whatever you use to push the driveshafts in is blunt and stays blunt to avoid damaging the CV boots. I didn't and ended up damaging the inner boot.   First though - shocks!   I was in two minds whether or not I was going to change/ upgrade my Billies with the GGP. After some considerations, I decided to take the plunge!   Initial look and feel impressions, these shocks are far better than I ever remember any Gaz products being. Exactly how good they are, time will tell...     On the car...     Suspension rebuild   Wishbones back on the car...     Disks and hubs...     Driveshafts in...     Wheels back on...     Bleeding   The brake bleeding was pretty straight forward, however we had to do it the old fashion way (as Martin R called it) by pumping the brakes and bleeding from the furthest point in. This wasn't too bad and was completed in an hour or so.   The bleeding of the clutch system, however ended up being the single most difficult and painful thing of the whole build. The bleed nipple is tight between the engine and the firewall and due to the location of the engine (I believe Stark place their engine further forward than any other conversion kits) its an absolute so and so to get to. It took the three of us over an hour to bleed the system adequately.   I wish at this point I had a tip, but the only thing I can say is take the pain and go through the process   All done and the car back on the wheel for the first time in almost three months.   What do you think Son?     Job done!

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Suspension & Drivetrain

The project has definitely taken a turn now. Things are actually going back on the car instead of being taken off.   Next job - the rebuilding of the suspension and installation of the drive shafts. Wishbones   The far side side wishbone had to be removed and sent back to Stark for modifications to enable it to fit and not clash with the new engine.     Once the wishbones where off the car, it was interesting to note that the ball joints were completely knackered. In fact, I couldn't believe how bad they were.   These had to go!     Once removed, I then used several coats of rust remover, wire brushing and cleaning off with hot soapy water to remove the majority of the rust. This was time consuming and you will need to take your time and be patient.   Rust remover applied...       I then took the opportunity to clean off the hubs. Very little rust or pitting on these, but just needed a good clean removing all the dirt and dried on oil/ grease.       Once dried, I took the decision to paint them with POR15 instead of powder coating. I guess the decision will be down to individual preference as the cost difference is actually not that big. As for me, it was just another task to do.   Man at work     I then left them over night to dry...     Lovely!     Then it was a matter of removing the rest of the old ball joints and installing the new. This is pretty straight forward job if you use the remover tool   Thanks to Dave (Ladders) and Neil for lending me the tool and getting it to me. Really appreciated.     Not a bad job at all...  

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Intermediate Drive Shaft Heat Shielding

One of the biggest problems with the Honda conversions is the amount of heat generated by the engine. The drive shafts are particularly vulnerable to this, especially the intermediate one.   The intermediate drive shaft sits directly behind the exhaust manifold and as such soaks up the majority of the heat generated by the exhaust pipes.   The Honda engine comes with a standard, black shielding, however given its colour, its always a good idea to try to either change the colour ( powder coat it silver perhaps) or the route I chose with is to cover it with Nimbus.   This was quite straight forward. I firstly cut an appropriately sizes piece and then patiently moulded it onto the original shield, following the contours.   I then drilled a series of holes and riveted the Nimbus on to the original shielding.   The finish job turned out okay...         Happy with that. Job done

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Engine Steady Mounts

Now that the engine is settled in and the lower wishbones are in place (covered in a future entry), its time to complete the securing of the engine.   The kit comes with the two main engine mounts at the top, and two steady arms at the bottom of the engine.   First up is the mount that secures to the chassis cross brace, in line with the firewall.   Prior to the installation of the engine, I drilled two holes to receive a 'U' shape bracket to which the arm is secured to...     Now, it was just a matter of pushing the arm into the bracket, bolt in place and bolt two bolts into the engine.   I used locktite in all occasion to ensure that the bolts do now work themselves loose...   You can see the bracket on the background...     Two bolts into the engine...     The second arm was also pretty straight forward.   Firstly, it was a matter of mock the installation first to allow the marking of the sub frame where the three bolts would go through.   Once done, it was a matter of drilling the three holes through the underside of the sub-frame.   TIP: Use a small drill bit first to give you more control of the drill and once it goes through, you can replace it with a larger bit to enlarge the hole. It works pretty well for me.     The three holes through the subframe...     Bolt the arm to the sub frame with two plates either side of the mount. Note that the nut on the far right has been placed on the inside to give it a little bit more protection from the exhaust heat...       Closer look....     Once happy, it was a matter of bolting the arm to the two bots attached to the gearbox housing...     That engine is not going anywhere!   I pretty happy with that now and as for the engine mounting, there is no more to do. Its a wrap and can officially pronounce it job done!

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Sub Frame Modification

Pretty much all the conversion kits require some type of sub-frame modifications. With the Stark kit, the only modification required is the enlargement of the nearside driveshaft hole to allow for any movements whilst the car is in transit.   This is a pretty simple task.   Firstly, I cut a series of cuts a long the area required to be removed...     It should be noted that the reason that I did this was because I did not really want to use a Dremmel on it. If you do, it would be just a matter of cutting out the section as you would expect.   With my method, once I had a number of slits, I then used a pair of players to bend them back and forth until they broke off. Once this was done, I used a file to smooth out the area...     As simple as that. Job done!

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mambosasa

 

Braided Brake Pipes Installation

We are now getting towards the business end of this installation.   The job on the list for this week, was to replace the original flexy brake pipes with uprated steel braided ones.   Searching through the tinternet, there were several options, I guess ranged quality and therefore price. I chose, for whatever reason to go for these...     I must say, I was quite pleased with the quality and seems to be as good as expected.   At this point, it's worth pointing out that if you don't know what you are doing when it comes to brakes, I suggest you go and get someone who does. Its just not worth risk!   So, in my case I called in my Ol' Pal Martin R. I can't thank him enough, as no matter how much I read up on this, I did not feel comfortable at all even considering taking this on. So, you can imagine my relief when the Man turned up   Here he is with my Nephew Jason...     Since the system was pretty low in brake fluids due to the fact that the clutch pipe was disconnected when the engine was originally removed, it was safe to get on with the work knowing that we were not going to get buckets of fluids coming out.   The first job to do was to detach the brake calliper assembly from the old flexy tube. This can prove to be pretty tight due to rust and age, but with a bit of biceps on to it, it should be possible to crack it...     Once that is removed, then its a matter of unbolting the rest of the pipe from two points. Firstly, there is a nut holding it to the car, and the coupler to the rigid pipe from the car. If you take your time with this, it should actualy be pretty simple and with a simple 3 spanner action, you should be able to remove it in about 10 minutes or so.     Once the old pipe is out of the way, clean around the area and start the installation of the new ones.   Now, Martin and I tried a couple of different ways of approaching this. We first tried to attach the new pipe to the car first then the calliper - That proved a little ackward, so we tried the other way round. On reflection, it will be down to your preferance really. On the day, we favoured the calliper first approach.   The installation is pretty much the reverse of the removal and takes less than ten minutes per wheel to screw everything back in place...   Attaching the pipe to the car...     Looking good...     Attaching to the calliper...     Nice!     Once all the rear were done, we went to attack the front...   The front is a little bit more ackward to work on due to the fact that the coupling between the flexy pipe with the rigid one from the car is actually in-board.   Luckilly, Lotus were kind enough to provide us with a little, and I do mean a little slot to just about get spanners in. With patience, you should eventually be able to get the nuts undone pretty much as the rears...     With Martin working on one side and myself on the other, we managed to get this done end to end in about 20minutes.   Thats the front done . ( Don't look at the wishbones as they are a disgrace!     All that is left to do now is top up the fluids, bleed the system and job done. This will be done at a later date once the rear suspension is re-assembled and brake discs put back on. But for now, Martin's job is done and he rides off into the sunset after saving another day   The patient pearing into the open space with expectations!     BTW, if you need a more technical guide to how to do this, I found this link useful Clicky   As for the braided brake hoses installation for now, we can all it job done!

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mambosasa

 

Coolant Hose Modification

Following the installation of the gear linkage system, it became apparent that the way I routed one of the hoses, was simply not going to work and in time would end up being an issue.   The hose I am referring to is the one running from the near side chassis, to the engine thermostat. The route I took, placed it in direct clash with the two gear linkage cables.   I must point out that speaking to other people who have installed this same kit, they do not seem to have had any issues. So this may just be due to my inexperience   Anyway, this is the clash I am referring to. As you can see from the photo, I had to run the two cables either side of the pipe and therefore 'pinching' it in the middle. This not only reduced the open radius of the pipe, but put undue stress on the two gear linkage cables.     First thing that I did was disconnect the pipe from the chassis outlet, pushed it back and rerouted it against the firewall.     Once in place, I then had to figure out a way of 'dog-legging' the pipe back into the chassis outlet.   I had several ideas, but the one I favoured the most was utilising one of the original Lotus hose that already had a little kink on it and cut it like this...     Once done, I then had to measure up from under the car, cut the pipe and by using a pipe connector and a couple of jubilee clips, joint the pipe to the modified original hose.   Then it was a matter of connecting the whole assembly to the chassis outlet and this is what I ended up with...         Now I am completely happy with this and I can formally call it job done!

mambosasa

mambosasa

 

Belt Installation

Quick update.   Whilst scratching about on Sunday, Carlton X (A VX220 refugee on here) come over for a nose and to say hey.   Here he is, with his rather bright VX220. His face seems to say ' that's never going to run Bis!' Oh ye of little faith     The belt installation is actually a very simple process.   All you need is a suitably length 14 inch spanner latched onto the pre-tensioner wheel and pull towards towards the front of the car.   What this does, is move the whole assembly forward and allow the belt to be wrapped around the pre-tensioning wheel (after being threaded through the other wheels) and once released, it will hold the belt in place.     Nothing more to it. Its as simple as that.   Job done!

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