Midlands Lotus Owners Club (MLOC)

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  1. mambosasa
    Latest Entry

    One of the more popular mods over the years has been replacing the original door pins with the slightly thicker pins from either Eliseshop or Eliseparts.

     

    Now, before I replaced mine, I didn't quite realise just how much my doors rattled during normal driving or even worse, when you hit a pothole or something.

     

    This mod is straight forward and took me about 10mins to complete, however I have read elsewhere with some folks taking them as long as an hour to line up the doors.

     

    Note: One thing that I did is ensure that I took note of the tidemarks around the existing door pins, with a view to use these to align the new ones. This worked like a charm. Apart from some really minor adjustments, the door worked pretty much straight away.

     

    gallery_590_1317_334906.jpg

     

    gallery_590_1317_308626.jpg

     

    gallery_590_1317_404944.jpg

     

    Results:

     

    The transformation is amazing. My car is generally rattle free, but by just adding this simple mod, all the sudden it has transformed it into a large german saloon :)

     

    I am very pleased.

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    Recent Entries

    Keith Simpson
    Latest Entry

    Well it's been 2 years now since i bought my M100. No serious problems to report apart from a puncture and the loss of the radio code after i replaced the battery. Just took her in for a second MOT and you guessed it she failed on the BRAKES, not having sufficient pressure and being biased on one side.

    Garage have recommended new callipers or having the original refurbished. Have gone for the refurbs as I want to keep the car original. Fingers crossed it works out.

    Watch this space.

    Thanks

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    Recent Entries

    Sanctum
    Latest Entry

    I had given up looking for a track car. I had resigned myself to the fact that there was nothing I actually wanted to buy out there in my price range. Imprezas, which could be had for that money, were so rusty they needed medical insurance and the word on the forums was that they were hellishly expensive to run on track days, and tended to ingest engines and gearboxes.

    Then I accidentally went back to looking at the Elise. I'd always wanted one since they first came out. I'm a particular fan of the rear styling of the S2. Looking around I realised that I could get a leggy one for under £10k. This seemed like a bargain and I convinced myself, through proper "man maths" that it would actually be cheaper than a £1000 track car in the long run, AND I could drive it at weekends.

     

    Unfortunately, one test drive later, and I realised that the power output of the base spec models wasn't going to be enough. That subaru I had test driven was still in my memory and I wasn't going to settle for anything slower.

     

    I kept looking, but the higher power output variants of the S2 were just too expensive. I knew what I really wanted was an S2 Exige, but I just couldn't justify £20k. But it was starting to look like that was the only "sensible" option.

     

    Then by accident, I spotted an old S1. I hadn't been looking for S1's, certainly not over £10k. And I was amazed at how strong the values of S1s had become over the last 12 months. The S1 I had spotted was far from standard, it had had all the track modifications I was going to do to a standard car already done, and then some. Plus, most importantly of all, it had a full Turbo Technics supercharger upgrade. The fact that it was also one owner from new and had only done 27k miles, was just icing on the cake.

     

    Some more man maths later, and I had secured the purchase of an S1 track slag with a 190hp TT supercharged K series on Nitrons with full race harnesses, harness bar and removable steering wheel. I was a very happy bunny. I figured, as long as I didn't bin it on a circuit, then it should appreciate in value and be a fairly sound investment, in fact costing me LESS than that £1000 track car I had started looking for. Yes, man maths at its best.

     

    As I write this, the car is in the garage having a few details sorted out. Then it will be coming home to be prepped for its first track day on the 19th July. Myself and my two co-conspirators are really looking forward to it.

     

    Next time: One track, one car, three drivers, what could go wrong?...

  2. blog-0075210001352242796.jpg

    Next up was to test fit the VW engine and find out where it was best suited for fitting before making up the engine mounts, I wanted the engine as low as possible and as far forward as possible, but I still had to leave enough room to fit the Inlet manifold and throttle body as well as thinking about the driveshaft position and making sure that the engine was sitting square

    in the chassis. This all turned out to be a bit of a head scratcher at times! It took me a couple of hours messing around with jacks and wooden blocks getting the engine sat just right, and then I could make the mounts. I have used Landrover Defender engine mounting rubbers as these are very strong and very simple in design, oh and at £4.00 each pretty cheap too smile.png I fiited 2 mounting rubbers to the O/S as there is 2 holes in the chassis plate 130mm apart and I figured that the g/box being at the N/S the O/S would be the heaviest, also with using 2 mounts together it stops the engine from rocking. The N/S uses just the 1 mounting rubber.

    With the mounting rubbers bolted down to the chassis I began fabricating the mounts, starting with the o/s I cut a piece of 70mm x 8mm thick plate 175mm long to fit over the mounting rubbers and drilled 2 11mm holes in them at the correct centers and bolted it down onto the mounting rubbers, then i used the remainder of the plate to fabricate an angled bracket to weld onto the plate bolted to the rubbers. The bracket was then removed and welded up and strengthening gussets added.

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    Recent Entries

    I thought I'd start a blog about my ownership of my Lotus, so here we go!

     

    Well this is my first Lotus, a silver 2009 Elise S. I only picked it up a couple of weeks ago and I absolutely love it. Having only had my first elise experience in june last year, it has been a relatively short time from desire to ownership, certainly a lot shorter than other people who have been striving for years! (the benefits of no significant other/kids etc).

     

    After having owned a string of reasonably boring reliable cars (VW Polo, Honda Civic Sport, Honda Civic Type R) OK that last one wasn't boring I really want a car to have a relationship with. The highs, the lows and everything in-between, I might be ready for what it throws at me, I might not, we'll have to wait and see.

     

    I have a few plans for the pair of us and a major goal would be to drive over to Spa for the GP (I'd also love to drive the track, but I don't think I'll be able to do that in the same trip unfortunately!) I'd like to survive the Nurburgring and drive Le Mans Bugatti. Also Italy would be an absolute dream come true. Baby steps, though, so I'm going to stick to the UK for the moment, but some track days are definitely gonna happen, along with some driver training.

     

    Well that's it for now...

     

    Be back soon.....

     

     

     

  3. Martin G
    Latest Entry

    Its been ages since I've posted anything on MLOC, in fact September 2009 seems to be my last entry.

     

    I'm still enjoying life with my Elise, a red 58 reg R on a private plate, with a Pipercross kit. I've done just over 13k miles, so am on my second set of rear tyres and heading for my second service.

     

    Having bought the car new from Stratstone Leicester, I decided to try Lotus Silverstone for the first service. They are about the same 35 miles from home and offered a more interesting choice of courtesy car. I was very happy with the Silverstone guys and enjoyed a day in their MX5. However the journey home was a traffic nightmare on the A5, so when it came to new rear Yokos just before Christmas, I swapped back to Stratstone in Leicester. They were really quick and it was good to see Andy who sold me the car again. Also, they are only 25 miles from my new office at Binley Business Park in Coventry.

     

    So, life with an Elise.... We have four cars in the family at the moment. The main family load lugger is a Honda CRV iDTEC auto, a superb family car much maligned in the motoring press, but more fool them. My daughter has an 02 Punto and the gang is completed by my our Toyota Aygo. The Aygo is really the other half of the Elise! It does the town trips and dropping off and collecting of kids when the Elise won'tt do. All in they cars complement each other and I can't imaging many people have a CRV, an Aygo and an Elise!

     

    The best times with the Elise are summer evenings with the roof off on a cross country run. Where it is less good is on a long motorway run. Last summer when it was really hot, I went up to the Peaks with the roof off on the M1 and the wind noise was deafening! On the return trip, the roof stayed off and I came home on A and B roads. That's what its all about.

     

    My original plan was to keep the Elise for three years. I've now started the third year and unusually. I'm not bored. There are still loads of things we want to do with the Elise. I have to try a track day, I want take it to France and the road trip to Skye still has to happen. Family illness played a part last year, so hopefully we can do more in 2011.

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    Recent Entries

    Lotus Elise S2

    Front Clam Removal

    JonS August 2010

    Disclaimer: First and foremost, I have to say that this is not my recommendations on how to remove the front clam, this is simply the way I did it using a few other guides and a bit of suck-it-and-see. The guides I found available were for newer versions of the S2 Elise. My car is a 2001 51 plate S2 Elise. It seems that some of the components vary to newer cars (mostly 2004 onwards) so I have done this to explain how I got the front clam off, what tools were used and the order things were done.

     

    Step 1 - Ramps:

    4mm Allen key

    8mm socket

    First off I made up some ramps from some 5x2 inch wood. I did this for two reasons:

    1. To help lift the car up to get the jack and a protective piece of wood under the car comfortably; and

    2. To help keep the lifting angle down when lifting one side at a time, i.e. lifting the car in two increments helped get the axel stands underneath rather than doing each side in one larger lift.

    Take off the top access panels, the radiator shrouds and the lower central plastic grill.

     

    gallery_1516_479_109356.jpg

    Step 2 - Wheel nuts:

    17mm socket

    Loosen wheel nuts slightly so they are easier to take off when the car is lifted.

    gallery_1516_479_55597.jpg

    Step 3 - Axel stands:

    I cut some more wood to use as protectors for the chassis and so they would sit on top of the axel stand. Lifting the car high enough to get the stands underneath was very nerve-racking.

    gallery_1516_479_88439.jpg

    Once I had the one stand under and lowered the jack, the car was then left balancing on the rear wheels and one stand so I had to do the other side fairly swiftly. Lifting in the two increments helped. Use the wooden ramps then as rear wheel chocks.

     

    gallery_1516_479_48176.jpg

    Step 4 - Wheels off:

    Take out the loosened wheel nuts, remove the wheels and place under the car for safety.

    gallery_1516_479_77469.jpg

    Step 5 - Wheel arch liners:

    8mm socket

    Philips screwdriver

     

    Both wheel arch liners need to come out, the smaller front one and the larger rear one. There are a number of nuts, screws and plastic screws that hold these in place, see image below, they are all easy to get at with the wheel off.

    gallery_1516_479_285072.jpg

    A number of the plastic screws on both sides had been rounded off over the years so I had already bought a couple of packs to replace them when they were to go back on.

    Step 6 - Fuse boxes:

    8mm socket

    Philips screwdriver

    On my car the fuse boxes are mounted on top of the near side wheel arch liner. These need to be removed from the liner but not taken off the car altogether.

    gallery_1516_479_15284.jpg

    Once the wheel arch liners are loosened, pull them down over the brake disc so you get access to above and below the fuseboxes. They are fixed with different sized rawl nuts. As they are in the wheelarch they have just got covered in all kinds of the day-to-day dirty so they were well and truly seized up. In the end I just forced them through the holes from the top and will replace the rawl plugs and fixings with new ones afterwards.

    gallery_1516_479_282516.jpg

    gallery_1516_479_148674.jpg

    Once the fuse boxes are unscrewed the wheel arch liners should come out easily.

    gallery_1516_479_155505.jpg

    Step 7 - Door hinge cover panels

    10mm socket

    10mm spanner

    Philips screwdriver

    Next up are the door hinge cover panels, also known as the side indicator panels. Apparently you don't need to remove these panels to take the clam off, but it certainly was one thing less to worry about when lifting the clam off at the end.

    These are a little tricky to remove as they are held in underneath within the chassis and on top by the clam itself (see images below).

    First you need to remove the forward of the two bolts on the inside of the wheel arch (Labeled #1 below), connecting the panel to the clam. You only need to loosen the rear bolt, DO NOT REMOVE the rear bolt (#2) as it will be extremely difficult to get back in. Careful of the thin aluminum washers, they will fall out once the bolts are loosened.

    Unclip the electrical connection to the indicator (#3) and tie it up inside so it doesn't catch anything on removal.

    gallery_1516_479_328988.jpg

    Next, remove the black plastic cover inside the door opening held in by two plastic screws. This reveals another 10mm bolt. Remove the bolt.

    gallery_1516_479_166592.jpg

    Next undo the four plastic screws holding the mud guard on (#1). The guard will not come off as it is fixed to the indicator panel. Finally, remove the two bolts underneath the car (#2).

    gallery_1516_479_223929.jpg

    You will then be able pull the bottom of the panel free of the chassis and slide the top part downwards.

    gallery_1516_479_62327.jpg

    Step 8 - Fixing to base of windscreen A-pillar

    6mm Allen key

    This Allen bolt is quite tricky to get at and you don't get much turning space. I have a mini ratchet that fits Allen keys so I was able to use this rather than a standard Allen key.

    gallery_1516_479_104321.jpg

    Step 9 - Fixing to lower frame of windscreen

    6mm Allen key

    Another Allen key bolt that is far easier to access, this is at the base of the screen on top of the clam. There is a rubber/foam washer underneath that will probably be stuck either to the clam or the car, be careful not to loose these at they pack the clam up and help the alignment.

    gallery_1516_479_100120.jpg

    Step 10 - Wiper motor cover

    Philips screwdriver

    This is an easy one, just two screws to take off to remove the wiper motor cover. This helps you get access to the nuts under the clam shells' spine.

    gallery_1516_479_74933.jpg

    Step 11 - Clamshell spine nuts

    8mm socket

    These are a little fiddly to reach but with the wiper motor cover off I was able to get the mini ratchet in there with an 8mm socket on. It took quite a few turns to get them off, and make sure you don't drop the washers or the nuts when they come off, as they could fall straight under the heater unit.

    gallery_1516_479_51248.jpg

    Step 12 - Remove windscreen wiper

    13mm socket (IIRC)

    This is just easy to remove (depending on whichwiper you have fitted). I have the original factory fitted wiper and I had bought a new one to replace it as it was getting a bit rusty and the blade needed replacing as well. Even if you are not replacing the wiper, it may be easer to take it off anyway to get better access around the whole clam.

    gallery_1516_479_13139.jpg

    Step 13 - Front corner fixings to radiator panel

    8mm socket

    There are two fixings to take out each side for the radiator panel. One attaches to the clam (#1) and the other attaches to the crash structure (#2). Both are fairly hidden, but easy to get at. The first one must be removed to take the clam off, and the other enables the radiator panel to move whilst you remove the clam.

    gallery_1516_479_234593.jpg

    Step 14 - Remove headlight covers

    Flathead screwdriver

    Next take off the headlight covers. There are three screw fixings on the rear of the headlight inside the wheel arch labeled below.

    gallery_1516_479_103048.jpg

    When removing the cover, be careful not to pull any paint off the clam with the rubber seal.

    Step 15 - Undo fixing inside headlight housing

    6mm Allen key

    Remove the Allen key bolt at the front of the headlight housing that fixes the clam to the top corner of the radiator panel.

    gallery_1516_479_146681.jpg

    Step 16 - Remove front section of undertray

    8mm socket

    To remove the front part of the under tray there are twelve 8mm bolts. Remove all these and slide the tray forward, pivot down and take out backwards to remove.

    gallery_1516_479_222706.jpg

    Step 17 - Unclip all electrical components

    Make sure all electrical cables are disconnected. The list is as follows:

    Headlights x2 (four wires)

    Front indicators x2 (two wires)

    Alarm sensors x2 (located at the top of the clam near the inspection panel aperture)

    Side indicators (already disconnected in Step 7)

    gallery_1516_479_40287.jpg

    gallery_1516_479_1737.jpg

    Step 18 - Lift clam clear

    Before removing the clam off completely, gently lift each part of the clam so it moves clear and ensure nothing is caught or still fixed.

    Watch carefully for any pincer points, and places that have to stretch over other components. One such place is the lower part of the clam spine, this is a particularly fragile point and is prone to fracture. Lift at the two drain ridges in the inspection panel aperture (#1).

    gallery_1516_479_218326.jpg

    When lifting the clam off, ensure you have towels laid on the floor under the nose. Pull the clam forward (#1). Once over the radiator panel pivot the clam up as if it were hinged on the floor (#2) (ie pull it up towards you). This pivoting motion will enable the clam to clear the lower 'wings' of the radiator panel without too much force.

    gallery_1516_479_230176.jpg

    Be sure to clear the lower part of the 'wing' of the radiator panel. This is particularly tight and could easily cause the GRP to fracture.

    Also, make sure you have somewhere soft to sit it down.

    gallery_1516_479_53068.jpg

    So, this is what you have left:

    gallery_1516_479_87547.jpg

    gallery_1516_479_24721.jpg

    So there you have it, clam off and ready for whatever you were going to do in the first place. I'll add add few notes later regarding putting the clam back on, but for now here are a few extra points you should note:

    • I replaced a lot of the fixings once the clam was off, and copper greased any metal fixings. I bought spare rawl plugs, nuts, bolts, and washers and also replaced old and rusted C-clips around the front under tray. If you ever had to take it off again, you'll be glad you did this.

    • Once each part was off, I put each set of fixings in a separate compartment of a storage box, in a particular order, so I knew which part they belonged to and what order they came off in.

    • I stored the clam as you see it above, lying on the grass, covered up in some plastic sheeting, however heavy rain was forecast after a couple of days so I move it to the garage and stored it nose up balancing on my bike and resting on towels at four points. it seemed pretty safe, and I felt much better than nose down as recommended elsewhere. As the nose had been repaired, this was already a weaker point so decided to store it the other way up. This is no way a recommendation, but how I found it best to store mine. You should always try and store it lying flat.

    • When easing the clam up for the first time, be aware that the A-pillar fixing brackets, seen in Step 8 bend very easily within the large 'blobs' of sikaflex type adhesive. I assume these can move slightly to aid alignment of the clam. Be careful not to move these too much.

    • You will loose skin off your knuckles, so be ready with a few expletives!

    It is pretty much the reverse to refit the clam, but I will add a few notes in due course, of my experience.

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    Recent Entries

    Rick
    Latest Entry

    After 2 years away from Lotus cars I have sold the Z4M- a great car- but having previously owned 4 Elises, I had to get back. I hope to collect my new SC on Tuesday 9th June after Carl has fitted Venture shield. I have had protective film fitted to 3 of my cars in the past and it's well worth it to keep the stone chips away, though you must get an experienced professional to fit it. I had to get my last car refitted a week later, as the result was very disappointing. Any way, I found Carl from a recommendation on this site so I am confident of a super job. Looking forward now to some great :D motoring!

  4. Some of the enhancements include:

     

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    Note that you can optionally switch back to the old "classic" profile view in the ACP.

     

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    Upload without the reload

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  5. JohnnyM
    Latest Entry

    oops, been too long since i wrote here, i've had 3 different cars in that time... :)

     

    end of nov 05 i got rid of the Focus RS and S2 Exige, got an Evo 8 MR FQ340 with some of the proceeds and put the rest down as deposit on a house, which i have since moved into B)

     

    Evo 8 was mad, very fast, but as the driver you never really felt like part of the action. You could feel the computers altering your course if you were really pressing on. I imagine that going beyond the limit of the computers was a one way ticket to investigating the scenery, so never really pushed that hard. You would have to be doing stupid speeds to achieve that in any event...

     

    March 06, finally tired of the evo doing the driving for me, and was going to get an exige cup240 from NW, although i had issues getting my deposit back from the house i was renting (which i was going to use for the deposit) so decided i would get an elise, was going to just get a 111r but john at NW talked me into the sports racer which is my current Lotus. Sods law played his hand 2 days later and the deposit came back from my rented house, which i wasnt expecting any time soon as my contract wasnt due to expire at the time!!! bugger, oh well theres always next year.

     

    Currently would love to get a 240r or an S exige. the one thing ive missed about the Evo is the massive mid range torque. The NA yota engine in the elise/NA exige doesnt really lend itself to the public road at all with all the power at the top end. I'm sure i will be in a blown exige in the not too distant future, but im enjoying having the lid off at the moment.... also got some house costs coming up....

     

    Also bought an 04 Alfa 147 2.0 as a cheap runaround for work. never owned an alfa before so thought i would give it a whirl, went for a selespeed version despite the bad press the system gets, red leather, bose stereo. It has i have to say has been superb for what i wanted it for. pottering about in city traffic with the odd motorway jaunt thrown in. If you know how to drive the selespeed box you can have some good fun on the backroads. It's no M3 SMG shiftwise, but its not bad, besides i wanted it for pottering about the city, where it is superb....

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    Stoney
    Latest Entry

    Just got back Wimbledon, my first long journey in my Elise 111R that I've had for just over a week now. Just over 800 miles on the clock now can not wait untill it's properly run in so I can really put my foot down.

     

    I was disappointed on how much the roof leaked even with the hard top on :)

     

    Who said these cars are not comfortable? I found it to be very comfortable.

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    Guest
    Latest Entry

    Just setup my blog B) , off on the Leicester Run this Sunday first of the year :) . Finished polishing the Elise yesterday, roof off, hope it does not rain!

  6. Guest
    Latest Entry

    As some of you may know im also the proud owner of a 1983 Eclat Excel. Its 2.2 litre with Toyota running gear. I believe Lotus made 186 of this type. I wonder how many are still going ? Liz has nicknamed it Bob, which stands for big old beast. Any similarity in this name and the name of the previous owner is a pure coincidence B) Its also fantastic fun. It was first bought for £14000. It did 50000 miles up to the first MOT. It has now done about 87000, so it has done 37000 in the last 20 years. I have every MOT to prove it. The original 0 to 60 time was 7 secs with a top speed of 135 MPH. Ive been trying to find the original bhp figures but im unable to find the as yet. I think it was about 160 ish. At the recent rolling road day it gave out 144 bhp. It did blow a bit of crap out mind. I should imagine it had not been reved up to 6800 rpm very often though. Ive been know to drive my Elise the way it was meant to be driven :) The old beast is getting the respect it deserves in this department. Starting it is an art form as those of you old enough to remember cars with manual chokes will understand.

  7. Guest
    Latest Entry

    I have just spent 3 days with a very nice set of artists brushes, touch-up paint & lacquer sorting out the stone chips on my car in anticipation of an imminent application of VentureShield to protect the paintwork.Firstly, paint chips or scratches, in my 36 years of time on this planet cannot be "painted out", "taped over", or any number of names for the numerous services or applications on the market to disguise or repair the damage and have no mistake it is PERMANENT (unless a complete re-spray with adequete professional preparation is undertaken) can disguise. So there is only on way to deal with stone chips and thats not to get them in the first place. How is that possible on a Lotus Elise which is so low to the ground? VentureShield will stop them permanently.VentureShield is a plastic coating which can be applied to the paintwork in sheets to form a barrier between the car body & outside elements. This is not the same stuff which traditionally was applied to Elise rear wheel arches and goes yellow and has an orange peel effect. That is the 3M product that was designed for helicopter blades and not with cars in mind. The film is optically clear and is virtually invisible when applied to the car. It is so clear in fact that it can even be applied to the headlights and indicators.When I saw this product I was amazed at how clear it is when on the car and it also comes with a LIFETIME WARRANTY. I was that impressed that I contacted the company in the UK and became an official Installer of the product with my Elise being the first car I did following the training course.If you would like information about the product contact me on 0845 052 1241

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