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Mrker60

Axle stands elise s2

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Hi.I want to refresh the paint on my calipers if I use the jacking point.

Is there anywere i can put a axle stand as i do each corner leaving the jack in situ.

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I’d be reluctant to use axle stands although it can be done, most popular way of supporting an Elise is using boxes of A4 paper at points A and B, or blocks of high density foam if you can get your hands on some, you can then do them all in one go. Elise’s and jacks are not good companions, so many stories of slippage and destroyed sills. If your going to jack it up use a good trolley jack and insert something between the jack and the underside of the car(ice hockey pucks are popular and cheap).

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Your choice, but I wouldn’t rely on just a jack. A box of A4 paper is about £10, new sills are mental money.

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Axle stands are fine, but the standard metal tops designed for an actual axle do not sit well (or safely!) on the Elise jacking points.  You either need axle stands with a round top, which are all stupidly expensive so far as I can tell, or a pad on top to match the flat round jacking points.  The front part of the chassis rail (B) is easy, but the rear points (C and D) are harder to get at and less stable.  The centre of the chassis rail (A) is only for jacking one side at a time, not for axle stands or a lift.  It is at the centre of gravity of the car and the whole car can tilt backwards and fall of, for example if you remove the front wheels.  Axle stands do tend to be taller than necessary even on the lowest setting, handy if you want to drop the fuel tank but a nuisance just for taking one wheel off.

For jacking, always use a trolley jack on the middle jacking point A, which will lift one side of the car safely.  The other jacking points should be used in pairs for support or for lifting the whole front or rear (or both) at the same time.  The chassis rails are smooth so you need a suitable top on the jack, preferably with a grippy rubber surface.  The standard metal cup slips far too easily and it also bigger than ideal.  The jacking area is very close to the fibreglass sill and it will crack if you try to jack on it.  Make very sure that the jack wheels will roll before the jack slips on the aluminium or the label itself.  There are horror pictures out there.

For emergency backup while working on one corner at a time for short periods, paper boxes or similar are convenient and you don't even have to rest the car on them if your jack will hold fort a few hours.  At the back, in a pinch, you can stick something under the bottom of the damper, but avoid the wishbones or balljoint which are likely to be damaged if they had to take the weight of the car.  If you want the car up for more than a few hours, best to support it properly at the right jacking points because it isn't ideal for the jack or the car.

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Thankyou.

That is a brill reply.I only need to do one wheel at a time.as i can only get to one side anyway in my garage.

I only need a few hours per corner and i would not be leaving it.ie get job done and on to next one.then turn car round.

So if i get a good trolley jack with a nice top and just for belts and braces get the paper blocks but not really using them to hold the car .

Just another thought my garage floor is on a slight slope is that a issue with trolley jack wheels .

Thankyou

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50 minutes ago, Mrker60 said:

Sorry ment to say also.

To use the a4 backup idea do any trays need taking off ?

No.  The front support points are accessible.  The rear ones are not but a box under the bottom of the damper is OK for saving your life if the jack drops, although it is not an official jacking point.

Might want to have a play with the trays anyway.  You need to get them off for even the most basic tasks like changing the oil.  Not hard, just a whole bunch of bolts to unscrew.

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Wrong side of the Pennines ;)  If you're shopping for a jack, make sure it will fit under the car.  Even standard ride height is too low for many jacks, and I'd guess yours will have been lowered a bit.

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i drive mine up onto 2 pieces of decking to get my low profile jack underneath, and even then its a bit close . i use a cut up old rubber exhaust mount on top of my jack cup to soften the impact on the jacking point. 

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On 03/01/2020 at 19:50, Lithopsian said:

Wrong side of the Pennines ;)  If you're shopping for a jack, make sure it will fit under the car.  Even standard ride height is too low for many jacks, and I'd guess yours will have been lowered a bit.

Halfords do a nice range of low entry trolley jacks now.

https://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/garage-workshop/trolley-jacks/halfords-advanced-2-tonne-low-profile-trolley-jack

 

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I've always used a Renault Clio/Laguna scissor jack...

...low profile so it fits under the sill

...no wheels to wobble about

...compact & easily carried

...flat top (with minor mod) to take a wood/hard rubber block

...lifts the whole side at the jacking 'A' points

...easily positioned correctly

...around £10 on eBay!

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