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Mark H

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  1. Sorry missed this, how are you getting that to happen? When I view it then I dont see any issues?
  2. Hi, please keep for Sale in the classifieds section please here: https://www.midlandslotus.co.uk/forum/classifieds/ Closing topic
  3. The Lotus Evija aero story: “A fighter jet in a world of kites” Exclusive Q&A with Lotus’ chief aerodynamicist Richard Hill New airflow animation explains the Evija all-electric hypercar’s unique porosity and phenomenal downforce Highly experienced senior engineer with 30+ years at Lotus details philosophy of the Evija’s sophisticated aerodynamics View the animation at https://youtu.be/aYyc4_z-wUE and www.media.lotuscars.com (Hethel, UK – 12 May 2020) – The unique porosity and phenomenal downforce of the Evija all-electric hypercar has been brought to life in a new animation from Lotus. For the first time, Richard Hill, the highly experienced senior engineer who has guided this critical element of the 2,000 PS car’s design, details the philosophy of the Evija’s sophisticated aerodynamics. Richard is chief aerodynamicist and has worked at Lotus for more than 30 years, supporting countless road and race car projects. When asked how the Evija compares to regular sports cars, he replied: “It’s like comparing a fighter jet to a child’s kite.’’ The full Q&A with Richard Hill is below: - What’s the overall philosophy behind the Evija’s aerodynamics? It’s about keeping the airflow low and flat at the front and guiding it through the body to emerge high at the rear. Put simply, it transforms the whole car into an inverted wing to produce that all-important dynamic downforce. - How would you compare the Evija’s aerodynamic performance to that of a regular sports car? It’s like comparing a fighter jet to a child’s kite.’’ - Can you explain the car’s porosity in aerodynamic terms? Most cars have to punch a hole in the air, to get through using brute force, but the Evija is unique because of its porosity. The car literally ‘breathes’ the air. The front acts like a mouth; it ingests the air, sucks every kilogram of value from it – in this case, the downforce – then exhales it through that dramatic rear end. - What role does that deep front splitter play? It’s designed in three sections; the larger central area provides air to cool the battery pack – which is mid-mounted behind the two seats – while the air channeled through the two smaller outer sections cools the front e-axle. The splitter minimises the amount of air allowed under the vehicle, thus reducing drag and lift on the underbody. It also provides something for the difference in pressure between the upper and lower splitter surfaces to push down on, so generating downforce.’ - Are the Venturi tunnels through the rear quarters part of the porosity? Yes, they feed the wake rearward to help cut drag. Think of it this way; without them the Evija would be like a parachute but with them it’s a butterfly net, and they make the car unique in the hypercar world. - What is the effect of the Evija’s active aerodynamics? The rear wing elevates from its resting position flush to the upper bodywork. It’s deployed into ‘clean’ air above the Evija, creating further downforce at the rear wheels. The car also has an F1-style Drag Reduction System (DRS), which is a horizontal plane mounted centrally at the rear, and deploying it make the car faster. - Lotus pioneered the full carbon fibre chassis in Formula 1, and the Evija is the first Lotus road car to use that technology. How has that helped to guide the aerodynamics? The chassis a single piece of moulded carbon fibre for exceptional strength, rigidity and safety. The underside is sculpted to force the airflow through the rear diffuser and into the Evija’s wake, causing an ‘upwash’ and the car’s phenomenal level of downforce. - The Evija is set to be the world’s lightest EV hypercar. Does weight affect aerodynamic performance? The car’s weight has no effect on overall aerodynamics. However, the lighter the car, the larger the percentage of overall grip is achieved through downforce and the lower the inertia of the car to change direction. - Can you confirm the drag coefficient and downforce figures for Evija? We will release that data later this year when final testing is complete. Richard Hill’s full title is Chief Engineer of Aerodynamics and Thermal Management, and he has worked at the company’s Hethel HQ since 1986. His role involves collaborating with the exterior designers of all new Lotus vehicles, from the early concept phase of a programme through to testing pre-production prototypes. The focus is always on developing the aerodynamic performance which ultimately helps produce the world-class dynamic characteristics for which Lotus is renowned. Richard also helps to ensure all vehicle cooling, cabin ventilation and thermal management systems work correctly. As well as working on road and race cars, Richard was the brains behind the Lotus Type 108 and Type 110 – better known as the Lotus Sport track and road bikes ridden to glory in the 1990s by legendary British Olympic and Tour de France cyclist Chris Boardman. He has also been instrumental in the development of the new track bike developed by Lotus for British Cycling athletes who will compete in the rescheduled Tokyo Olympics.
  4. The Lotus Evija aero story: “A fighter jet in a world of kites” Exclusive Q&A with Lotus’ chief aerodynamicist Richard Hill New airflow animation explains the Evija all-electric hypercar’s unique porosity and phenomenal downforce Highly experienced senior engineer with 30+ years at Lotus details philosophy of the Evija’s sophisticated aerodynamics View the animation at https://youtu.be/aYyc4_z-wUE and www.media.lotuscars.com (Hethel, UK – 12 May 2020) – The unique porosity and phenomenal downforce of the Evija all-electric hypercar has been brought to life in a new animation from Lotus. For the first time, Richard Hill, the highly experienced senior engineer who has guided this critical element of the 2,000 PS car’s design, details the philosophy of the Evija’s sophisticated aerodynamics. Richard is chief aerodynamicist and has worked at Lotus for more than 30 years, supporting countless road and race car projects. When asked how the Evija compares to regular sports cars, he replied: “It’s like comparing a fighter jet to a child’s kite.’’ The full Q&A with Richard Hill is below: - What’s the overall philosophy behind the Evija’s aerodynamics? It’s about keeping the airflow low and flat at the front and guiding it through the body to emerge high at the rear. Put simply, it transforms the whole car into an inverted wing to produce that all-important dynamic downforce. - How would you compare the Evija’s aerodynamic performance to that of a regular sports car? It’s like comparing a fighter jet to a child’s kite.’’ - Can you explain the car’s porosity in aerodynamic terms? Most cars have to punch a hole in the air, to get through using brute force, but the Evija is unique because of its porosity. The car literally ‘breathes’ the air. The front acts like a mouth; it ingests the air, sucks every kilogram of value from it – in this case, the downforce – then exhales it through that dramatic rear end. - What role does that deep front splitter play? It’s designed in three sections; the larger central area provides air to cool the battery pack – which is mid-mounted behind the two seats – while the air channeled through the two smaller outer sections cools the front e-axle. The splitter minimises the amount of air allowed under the vehicle, thus reducing drag and lift on the underbody. It also provides something for the difference in pressure between the upper and lower splitter surfaces to push down on, so generating downforce.’ - Are the Venturi tunnels through the rear quarters part of the porosity? Yes, they feed the wake rearward to help cut drag. Think of it this way; without them the Evija would be like a parachute but with them it’s a butterfly net, and they make the car unique in the hypercar world. - What is the effect of the Evija’s active aerodynamics? The rear wing elevates from its resting position flush to the upper bodywork. It’s deployed into ‘clean’ air above the Evija, creating further downforce at the rear wheels. The car also has an F1-style Drag Reduction System (DRS), which is a horizontal plane mounted centrally at the rear, and deploying it make the car faster. - Lotus pioneered the full carbon fibre chassis in Formula 1, and the Evija is the first Lotus road car to use that technology. How has that helped to guide the aerodynamics? The chassis a single piece of moulded carbon fibre for exceptional strength, rigidity and safety. The underside is sculpted to force the airflow through the rear diffuser and into the Evija’s wake, causing an ‘upwash’ and the car’s phenomenal level of downforce. - The Evija is set to be the world’s lightest EV hypercar. Does weight affect aerodynamic performance? The car’s weight has no effect on overall aerodynamics. However, the lighter the car, the larger the percentage of overall grip is achieved through downforce and the lower the inertia of the car to change direction. - Can you confirm the drag coefficient and downforce figures for Evija? We will release that data later this year when final testing is complete. Richard Hill’s full title is Chief Engineer of Aerodynamics and Thermal Management, and he has worked at the company’s Hethel HQ since 1986. His role involves collaborating with the exterior designers of all new Lotus vehicles, from the early concept phase of a programme through to testing pre-production prototypes. The focus is always on developing the aerodynamic performance which ultimately helps produce the world-class dynamic characteristics for which Lotus is renowned. Richard also helps to ensure all vehicle cooling, cabin ventilation and thermal management systems work correctly. As well as working on road and race cars, Richard was the brains behind the Lotus Type 108 and Type 110 – better known as the Lotus Sport track and road bikes ridden to glory in the 1990s by legendary British Olympic and Tour de France cyclist Chris Boardman. He has also been instrumental in the development of the new track bike developed by Lotus for British Cycling athletes who will compete in the rescheduled Tokyo Olympics. This post has been promoted to an article
  5. A new model of integrating connected vehicles, connected homes and connected customers is being developed New, flexible platform designed to power a future digital mobility lifestyle New global sustainability programme targets net-zero carbon across Lotus operations Centrica plc, the parent company of British Gas, and British motor manufacturer Lotus are working together to develop a new model for electric vehicle ownership that fully integrates future mobility and energy. By making the car an extension of the home, capable of storing electricity, minimising emissions and generating new income by providing services to the energy market, the companies aim to redefine the customer relationship with cars – one controlled by smart devices at home and on the move. The energy company will also facilitate a sustainability program that leverages innovative, low carbon technologies, and helps mitigate the environmental impact of everything from manufacturing through to sales and the day-to-day activities of Lotus employees, helping meet Lotus’ carbon reduction aspirations. The new partnership will help establish a new global charging and energy infrastructure for new products as part of Lotus’ journey to net-zero carbon following huge investment into the business since 2018. Centrica Group CEO Chris O’Shea said: “We are committed to helping our customers and communities achieve net-zero and to do so, we must enable the change to electric vehicles. We have the technology, the skills and the scale to do this and our partnership with Lotus is another step in bringing our commitment to life.” Lotus Cars CEO Phil Popham said: “Our journey to net-zero carbon is absolutely lock-in-step with the Vision80 strategy for Lotus – taking us to eighty years of the business in 2028. By then we will have transformed Lotus into a truly global player in the high-performance high-technology sector with a new range of cars that remain true to our fundamental promise of always being ‘For The Drivers’. The difference is the energy and infrastructure that will power and support these products in the future – this new partnership demonstrates the progress being made and the ambition of our vision.” Carl Bayliss, Vice President of Centrica Innovations, said: “Owning an electric vehicle isn’t the same as owning an internal combustion engine car. We see a future where the customer, car and home are connected, enabling new services beyond charging the car, and new products and experiences replacing the unremarkable standard relationship with energy and the ownership of a car today. “Lotus is the perfect partner as we embark on this, given the recognition and appeal of the brand globally and the fact that it is right at the beginning of its electrification journey.” Uday Senapati, Executive Director, Corporate Strategy for Lotus, added: “Centrica brings a wealth of energy sector expertise to the table that will not only help us to determine the right course for our mobility strategy, but the hands-on capability to ensure that the right infrastructure is in place globally. The future of mobility is a huge opportunity for providing value-added services to the consumer and this platform will put Lotus at the forefront of that digital mobility ecosystem. “We have set ambitious targets for decarbonising both our vehicles and our operations. Given the rate of change required and the importance of getting it right first time, the support of our strategic partner Centrica is going to be vital.” Production of the all-electric Lotus Evija hypercar will start at the company’s famous Hethel, Norfolk HQ later in 2020 – marking the start of Lotus’ journey to electrifying its growing range of vehicles. The new strategic partnership sees the two companies embark on a multi-work-stream strategy together, covering: A dedicated Lotus EV Energy strategy Charging infrastructure serving Lotus’ global network and customers De-carbonisation strategy for Lotus operations globally A breakthrough new energy product and platform integrating connected vehicles, homes and customers to support the growth in digital mobility lifestyle
  6. A new model of integrating connected vehicles, connected homes and connected customers is being developed New, flexible platform designed to power a future digital mobility lifestyle New global sustainability programme targets net-zero carbon across Lotus operations Centrica plc, the parent company of British Gas, and British motor manufacturer Lotus are working together to develop a new model for electric vehicle ownership that fully integrates future mobility and energy. By making the car an extension of the home, capable of storing electricity, minimising emissions and generating new income by providing services to the energy market, the companies aim to redefine the customer relationship with cars – one controlled by smart devices at home and on the move. The energy company will also facilitate a sustainability program that leverages innovative, low carbon technologies, and helps mitigate the environmental impact of everything from manufacturing through to sales and the day-to-day activities of Lotus employees, helping meet Lotus’ carbon reduction aspirations. The new partnership will help establish a new global charging and energy infrastructure for new products as part of Lotus’ journey to net-zero carbon following huge investment into the business since 2018. Centrica Group CEO Chris O’Shea said: “We are committed to helping our customers and communities achieve net-zero and to do so, we must enable the change to electric vehicles. We have the technology, the skills and the scale to do this and our partnership with Lotus is another step in bringing our commitment to life.” Lotus Cars CEO Phil Popham said: “Our journey to net-zero carbon is absolutely lock-in-step with the Vision80 strategy for Lotus – taking us to eighty years of the business in 2028. By then we will have transformed Lotus into a truly global player in the high-performance high-technology sector with a new range of cars that remain true to our fundamental promise of always being ‘For The Drivers’. The difference is the energy and infrastructure that will power and support these products in the future – this new partnership demonstrates the progress being made and the ambition of our vision.” Carl Bayliss, Vice President of Centrica Innovations, said: “Owning an electric vehicle isn’t the same as owning an internal combustion engine car. We see a future where the customer, car and home are connected, enabling new services beyond charging the car, and new products and experiences replacing the unremarkable standard relationship with energy and the ownership of a car today. “Lotus is the perfect partner as we embark on this, given the recognition and appeal of the brand globally and the fact that it is right at the beginning of its electrification journey.” Uday Senapati, Executive Director, Corporate Strategy for Lotus, added: “Centrica brings a wealth of energy sector expertise to the table that will not only help us to determine the right course for our mobility strategy, but the hands-on capability to ensure that the right infrastructure is in place globally. The future of mobility is a huge opportunity for providing value-added services to the consumer and this platform will put Lotus at the forefront of that digital mobility ecosystem. “We have set ambitious targets for decarbonising both our vehicles and our operations. Given the rate of change required and the importance of getting it right first time, the support of our strategic partner Centrica is going to be vital.” Production of the all-electric Lotus Evija hypercar will start at the company’s famous Hethel, Norfolk HQ later in 2020 – marking the start of Lotus’ journey to electrifying its growing range of vehicles. The new strategic partnership sees the two companies embark on a multi-work-stream strategy together, covering: A dedicated Lotus EV Energy strategy Charging infrastructure serving Lotus’ global network and customers De-carbonisation strategy for Lotus operations globally A breakthrough new energy product and platform integrating connected vehicles, homes and customers to support the growth in digital mobility lifestyle This post has been promoted to an article
  7. Four new Lotus Elise Classic Heritage Editions pay tribute to the company’s pioneering racing history All feature instantly recognisable Lotus motorsport colour schemes Enhanced exterior and interior equipment list delivers exceptional value for money Production limited to just 100 cars in total (Hethel, UK – 6 May 2020) – Lotus has launched four new limited-edition versions of the Elise, each with a vibrant and distinctive colour palette which pays tribute to the company’s pioneering and highly successful racing history. The exterior colour combinations are black and gold; red, white and gold; blue, red and silver; and blue and white. The famous black and gold references the livery of the Lotus Type 72D which Emerson Fittipaldi raced to five victories over the course of the 1972 Formula 1 season. Red, white and gold echoes the Type 49B that Graham Hill raced in 1968, while the blue, red and silver is inspired by the Lotus Type 81 of 1980 driven by Nigel Mansell, Elio de Angelis and Mario Andretti. The fourth new Elise, finished in blue and white, is in tribute to the Lotus Type 18 design from 1960. Exactly 60 years ago, it was the first Lotus car to achieve a Formula 1 pole position and victory, courtesy of the late Sir Stirling Moss, at the Monaco Grand Prix. Officially called the Elise Classic Heritage Editions, all four offer an enhanced exterior and interior spec over the Elise Sport 220 on which they’re based. They are on sale now across selected international markets. As well as their unique colour schemes – instantly recognisable by motorsport fans worldwide – each car comes with an exclusive numbered ‘build plaque’ on the dashboard referencing the limited production run. A total of just 100 cars will be made, with the final numbers of each variant dictated by customer demand. Each car has as standard a number of features which were previously on the options list. These include DAB digital radio with four speakers, air-conditioning, cruise control, ultra-lightweight forged alloy wheels with racing livery finish, two-piece disc brakes and black carpet with floor mats. The Elise interior colour pack is also now integrated as standard. Elements include the upper door trim and central seat insert finished to match the exterior, with detailing on the door, gear selector surround and dashboard picking out key colours. The only one that’s different is the blue and white car, which has red alcantara seat centres. Pricing is very simple – all four cars cost exactly the same, at £46,250 (€47,848). While that’s £6,350 more than a standard Elise Cup 220, with £11,735 of added features it represents outstanding value for money. Ema Forster, Head of Product Marketing, Lotus, said: “Motorsport success has been at the heart of the Lotus philosophy for more than seven decades, and the Elise is our iconic roadster known around the world for its exceptional ‘For The Drivers’ performance. What better way to celebrate than by bringing these two pillars of our brand together, launching four new Classic Heritage cars which fans will instantly recognise?” Several optional extras are available for each car, including a fibreglass hardtop roof, lightweight lithium-ion battery and titanium lightweight exhaust. The Lotus Elise is an icon of lightweight performance car design and engineering. Built around its driver-focused interior, it delivers a pure, immersive and exhilarating on-the-road experience with outstanding ride and handling.
  8. Four new Lotus Elise Classic Heritage Editions pay tribute to the company’s pioneering racing history All feature instantly recognisable Lotus motorsport colour schemes Enhanced exterior and interior equipment list delivers exceptional value for money Production limited to just 100 cars in total (Hethel, UK – 6 May 2020) – Lotus has launched four new limited-edition versions of the Elise, each with a vibrant and distinctive colour palette which pays tribute to the company’s pioneering and highly successful racing history. The exterior colour combinations are black and gold; red, white and gold; blue, red and silver; and blue and white. The famous black and gold references the livery of the Lotus Type 72D which Emerson Fittipaldi raced to five victories over the course of the 1972 Formula 1 season. Red, white and gold echoes the Type 49B that Graham Hill raced in 1968, while the blue, red and silver is inspired by the Lotus Type 81 of 1980 driven by Nigel Mansell, Elio de Angelis and Mario Andretti. The fourth new Elise, finished in blue and white, is in tribute to the Lotus Type 18 design from 1960. Exactly 60 years ago, it was the first Lotus car to achieve a Formula 1 pole position and victory, courtesy of the late Sir Stirling Moss, at the Monaco Grand Prix. Officially called the Elise Classic Heritage Editions, all four offer an enhanced exterior and interior spec over the Elise Sport 220 on which they’re based. They are on sale now across selected international markets. As well as their unique colour schemes – instantly recognisable by motorsport fans worldwide – each car comes with an exclusive numbered ‘build plaque’ on the dashboard referencing the limited production run. A total of just 100 cars will be made, with the final numbers of each variant dictated by customer demand. Each car has as standard a number of features which were previously on the options list. These include DAB digital radio with four speakers, air-conditioning, cruise control, ultra-lightweight forged alloy wheels with racing livery finish, two-piece disc brakes and black carpet with floor mats. The Elise interior colour pack is also now integrated as standard. Elements include the upper door trim and central seat insert finished to match the exterior, with detailing on the door, gear selector surround and dashboard picking out key colours. The only one that’s different is the blue and white car, which has red alcantara seat centres. Pricing is very simple – all four cars cost exactly the same, at £46,250 (€47,848). While that’s £6,350 more than a standard Elise Cup 220, with £11,735 of added features it represents outstanding value for money. Ema Forster, Head of Product Marketing, Lotus, said: “Motorsport success has been at the heart of the Lotus philosophy for more than seven decades, and the Elise is our iconic roadster known around the world for its exceptional ‘For The Drivers’ performance. What better way to celebrate than by bringing these two pillars of our brand together, launching four new Classic Heritage cars which fans will instantly recognise?” Several optional extras are available for each car, including a fibreglass hardtop roof, lightweight lithium-ion battery and titanium lightweight exhaust. The Lotus Elise is an icon of lightweight performance car design and engineering. Built around its driver-focused interior, it delivers a pure, immersive and exhilarating on-the-road experience with outstanding ride and handling.
  9. Maybe behind closed doors? https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/formula1/52435988
  10. Legendary Brazilian racer took his maiden F1 win in Lotus 97T on 21 April 1985 Pouring rain at Estoril circuit, yet still took the chequered flag and fastest lap Lotus marks the anniversary with exclusive podcast interview with Senna’s mechanic Chris Dinnage on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and ShoutEngine. “His concentration levels were unparalleled – I’ve never met anyone like him,” says Dinnage Rare Senna images from a private collection, plus new US LOT blog at media.lotuscars.com (Hethel, UK – 21 April 2020) – It was 35 years ago today, in monsoon conditions, that a determined young Brazilian raced to his first Formula 1 victory and cemented his name in motorsport folklore. It was Sunday 21 April and the 1985 Portuguese Grand Prix. Behind the wheel of a Lotus 97T was Ayrton Senna, just turned 25 years old. With the car at the absolute limit of its grip, he delivered a masterclass in wet-weather driving for the hardy Estoril crowd and powered to the chequered flag. Such was his dominance he lapped the entire field up to second place, finishing over a minute ahead of his nearest competitor. In just his second race for Lotus, Senna took the first of 41 career F1 victories – six for Lotus – and a legend was born. The performance stunned his rivals and lay down a marker that would see him go on to become a global sporting icon and a national hero in his native Brazil. Despite his tragic death in 1994, he remains a racing legend. Sempre Senna (Senna Forever). Today, Lotus is marking the occasion with an exclusive new podcast, a series of rarely seen classic archive images of Senna and his 97T race car from a private collection, and a new blog revealing insights into Senna the man and his time racing for Lotus. The podcast – part of the recently launched US LOT Sessions – features an all-new and exclusive interview with Chris Dinnage, Senna’s chief mechanic in 1985 and today the Team Manager at Classic Team Lotus. Describing the raw emotion of the weekend and the Lotus that catapulted Senna to stardom, Dinnage says: “Ayrton hadn’t tested the car in the wet – that was the first time he’d driven in those conditions. Estoril was when he really hit the scene, because people sat up and thought ‘hang on, he’s lapped almost everybody’ and we knew we had something pretty special.” Dinnage adds it was this which made the difference between Ayrton and other drivers, explaining: “Ayrton had the same raw pace as everyone else, but he was only using 50% of his capacity as a human to drive the car at full speed, leaving him the other 50% to be really aware of everything that was going on around him. His concentration levels were unparalleled – I’ve never met anyone else like him.” You can listen to podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and ShoutEngine. The US LOT Blog is hosted on the Lotus media site www.media.lotuscars.com. Reigning in the rain: Senna at Estoril Rain, as ever, is the great leveler for on-track performance. It requires sensitive driver inputs, instinctive car control and a sympathetic approach to the mechanical set-up. One weekend in Estoril revealed Senna could excel in all. It was also the setting for Senna’s first-ever F1 pole position, and he went on to claim another 15 for Lotus. His record of 65 F1 pole positions is eclipsed only by Michael Schumacher and Lewis Hamilton. In the race, Senna got off the line well and led a Lotus 1-2 after the first lap. With a clear road ahead, he began to pull away from team-mate Elio de Angelis and the chasing pack. The race was one of bravery and attrition; conditions worsened and, in an era before safety cars, pit-to-car radio or yellow flags, cars were pulling off the track or hitting the barriers. Senna remained calm and composed in his Lotus and, after two hours of brutal racing, crossed the line first. Just nine cars were classified as finishing. He later commented: “It was a hard, tactical race, corner by corner, lap by lap, because conditions were changing all the time. The car was sliding everywhere – it was very hard to keep the car under control. Once I had all four wheels on the grass, totally out of control, but the car came back on the circuit. People later said that my win in the wet at Donington in ’93 was my greatest performance – no way! I had traction control!” The Lotus 97T chassis was the first in F1 to use bargeboards that were placed between the front wheels and sidepods. This aided airflow around the side of the car and is a concept that still exists in motorsport to this day. The car took eight poles and three wins that season with Senna and de Angelis at the wheel. Today, the actual Lotus 97T in which Senna won at Estoril is owned and maintained by Classic Team Lotus. Like Lotus, it is based in Hethel, Norfolk, and uses a team of expert and knowledgeable designers, engineers and mechanics – including Chris Dinnage – to preserve classic Lotus F1 cars for their owners. Classic Team Lotus is also the owner of the archive images showing Senna and his 97T. Clive Chapman, Managing Director of Classic Team Lotus and son of Lotus founder Colin Chapman, said: “For Team Lotus, Ayrton joining was a vital piece in the jigsaw, as the team faced the challenge of F1 without my father. Ayrton’s technical abilities, driving skills, hard work and motivational powers all proved to be more vital ingredients to the Team Lotus mix, which led to success almost immediately.”
  11. Legendary Brazilian racer took his maiden F1 win in Lotus 97T on 21 April 1985 Pouring rain at Estoril circuit, yet still took the chequered flag and fastest lap Lotus marks the anniversary with exclusive podcast interview with Senna’s mechanic Chris Dinnage on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and ShoutEngine. “His concentration levels were unparalleled – I’ve never met anyone like him,” says Dinnage Rare Senna images from a private collection, plus new US LOT blog at media.lotuscars.com (Hethel, UK – 21 April 2020) – It was 35 years ago today, in monsoon conditions, that a determined young Brazilian raced to his first Formula 1 victory and cemented his name in motorsport folklore. It was Sunday 21 April and the 1985 Portuguese Grand Prix. Behind the wheel of a Lotus 97T was Ayrton Senna, just turned 25 years old. With the car at the absolute limit of its grip, he delivered a masterclass in wet-weather driving for the hardy Estoril crowd and powered to the chequered flag. Such was his dominance he lapped the entire field up to second place, finishing over a minute ahead of his nearest competitor. In just his second race for Lotus, Senna took the first of 41 career F1 victories – six for Lotus – and a legend was born. The performance stunned his rivals and lay down a marker that would see him go on to become a global sporting icon and a national hero in his native Brazil. Despite his tragic death in 1994, he remains a racing legend. Sempre Senna (Senna Forever). Today, Lotus is marking the occasion with an exclusive new podcast, a series of rarely seen classic archive images of Senna and his 97T race car from a private collection, and a new blog revealing insights into Senna the man and his time racing for Lotus. The podcast – part of the recently launched US LOT Sessions – features an all-new and exclusive interview with Chris Dinnage, Senna’s chief mechanic in 1985 and today the Team Manager at Classic Team Lotus. Describing the raw emotion of the weekend and the Lotus that catapulted Senna to stardom, Dinnage says: “Ayrton hadn’t tested the car in the wet – that was the first time he’d driven in those conditions. Estoril was when he really hit the scene, because people sat up and thought ‘hang on, he’s lapped almost everybody’ and we knew we had something pretty special.” Dinnage adds it was this which made the difference between Ayrton and other drivers, explaining: “Ayrton had the same raw pace as everyone else, but he was only using 50% of his capacity as a human to drive the car at full speed, leaving him the other 50% to be really aware of everything that was going on around him. His concentration levels were unparalleled – I’ve never met anyone else like him.” You can listen to podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and ShoutEngine. The US LOT Blog is hosted on the Lotus media site www.media.lotuscars.com. Reigning in the rain: Senna at Estoril Rain, as ever, is the great leveler for on-track performance. It requires sensitive driver inputs, instinctive car control and a sympathetic approach to the mechanical set-up. One weekend in Estoril revealed Senna could excel in all. It was also the setting for Senna’s first-ever F1 pole position, and he went on to claim another 15 for Lotus. His record of 65 F1 pole positions is eclipsed only by Michael Schumacher and Lewis Hamilton. In the race, Senna got off the line well and led a Lotus 1-2 after the first lap. With a clear road ahead, he began to pull away from team-mate Elio de Angelis and the chasing pack. The race was one of bravery and attrition; conditions worsened and, in an era before safety cars, pit-to-car radio or yellow flags, cars were pulling off the track or hitting the barriers. Senna remained calm and composed in his Lotus and, after two hours of brutal racing, crossed the line first. Just nine cars were classified as finishing. He later commented: “It was a hard, tactical race, corner by corner, lap by lap, because conditions were changing all the time. The car was sliding everywhere – it was very hard to keep the car under control. Once I had all four wheels on the grass, totally out of control, but the car came back on the circuit. People later said that my win in the wet at Donington in ’93 was my greatest performance – no way! I had traction control!” The Lotus 97T chassis was the first in F1 to use bargeboards that were placed between the front wheels and sidepods. This aided airflow around the side of the car and is a concept that still exists in motorsport to this day. The car took eight poles and three wins that season with Senna and de Angelis at the wheel. Today, the actual Lotus 97T in which Senna won at Estoril is owned and maintained by Classic Team Lotus. Like Lotus, it is based in Hethel, Norfolk, and uses a team of expert and knowledgeable designers, engineers and mechanics – including Chris Dinnage – to preserve classic Lotus F1 cars for their owners. Classic Team Lotus is also the owner of the archive images showing Senna and his 97T. Clive Chapman, Managing Director of Classic Team Lotus and son of Lotus founder Colin Chapman, said: “For Team Lotus, Ayrton joining was a vital piece in the jigsaw, as the team faced the challenge of F1 without my father. Ayrton’s technical abilities, driving skills, hard work and motivational powers all proved to be more vital ingredients to the Team Lotus mix, which led to success almost immediately.”
  12. Customers will use a state-of-the-art touch-screen configurator to personalise their Evija Exclusive gift programme will culminate in unique build book Stunning new images and animation reveal all-electric two-seater in three new colours – Atomic Red, Solaris Yellow and Carbon Black View the animation at: As the Evija moves ever closer to series production, Lotus has revealed how customers of the all-electric hypercar are choosing their vehicle’s bespoke specification. The exclusive nature of the 2,000 PS two-seater means every customer journey is unique. Requests for personalisation on every aspect of the Evija – from striking exterior paint colour combinations to highly detailed interior trim – are all part of the enhanced ordering process. Production of the Lotus Evija will start later in 2020, and the first year’s allocation is already designated to customers around the world. The starting point for every car’s specification is an all-new touch-screen configurator. Designed especially for Lotus, its ultra-powerful graphics processor creates stunning high-definition ‘photo-realistic’ images and animations. Developed using advanced gaming software, these allow the buyer to build and personalise their own car from the ground up and visualise it from every angle, inside and out. Thanks to an advanced imaging technique known as ray-tracing, they can even place their Evija into multiple environments around the world to see how localised sunlight levels will affect their choices. The final element is the creation of a fully personalised ‘360 degree fly-through’ film exclusive to each customer. Lotus has released a series of all-new images of the Evija captured from the configurator. They show a car set inside the Lotus Design studios at Hethel, UK – the global home of Lotus since 1966 – and finished in stunning Atomic Red with Carbon Black accent pack. They are accompanied by a new animation which additionally reveals the car in Solaris Yellow and Carbon Black. The configurator is just one element of the Evija experience. At regular intervals during the purchase process, each customer will receive from Lotus a unique gift to reflect the exclusive and technical nature of the Evija. That will culminate in a beautiful hand-crafted build book, packed with stunning imagery of the customer’s individual car during key moments of its assembly. The book will be presented to the customer with their Evija key as part of the handover celebrations. Simon Clare, Executive Director, Global Marketing, Lotus, said: “We know every customer journey will be unique and our highly experienced customer relations team is ready to support any requests. With state-of-the-art digital tools such as the new configurator, we can accommodate customer preferences and requirements from anywhere in the world at the touch of a button.”
  13. Customers will use a state-of-the-art touch-screen configurator to personalise their Evija Exclusive gift programme will culminate in unique build book Stunning new images and animation reveal all-electric two-seater in three new colours – Atomic Red, Solaris Yellow and Carbon Black View the animation at: As the Evija moves ever closer to series production, Lotus has revealed how customers of the all-electric hypercar are choosing their vehicle’s bespoke specification. The exclusive nature of the 2,000 PS two-seater means every customer journey is unique. Requests for personalisation on every aspect of the Evija – from striking exterior paint colour combinations to highly detailed interior trim – are all part of the enhanced ordering process. Production of the Lotus Evija will start later in 2020, and the first year’s allocation is already designated to customers around the world. The starting point for every car’s specification is an all-new touch-screen configurator. Designed especially for Lotus, its ultra-powerful graphics processor creates stunning high-definition ‘photo-realistic’ images and animations. Developed using advanced gaming software, these allow the buyer to build and personalise their own car from the ground up and visualise it from every angle, inside and out. Thanks to an advanced imaging technique known as ray-tracing, they can even place their Evija into multiple environments around the world to see how localised sunlight levels will affect their choices. The final element is the creation of a fully personalised ‘360 degree fly-through’ film exclusive to each customer. Lotus has released a series of all-new images of the Evija captured from the configurator. They show a car set inside the Lotus Design studios at Hethel, UK – the global home of Lotus since 1966 – and finished in stunning Atomic Red with Carbon Black accent pack. They are accompanied by a new animation which additionally reveals the car in Solaris Yellow and Carbon Black. The configurator is just one element of the Evija experience. At regular intervals during the purchase process, each customer will receive from Lotus a unique gift to reflect the exclusive and technical nature of the Evija. That will culminate in a beautiful hand-crafted build book, packed with stunning imagery of the customer’s individual car during key moments of its assembly. The book will be presented to the customer with their Evija key as part of the handover celebrations. Simon Clare, Executive Director, Global Marketing, Lotus, said: “We know every customer journey will be unique and our highly experienced customer relations team is ready to support any requests. With state-of-the-art digital tools such as the new configurator, we can accommodate customer preferences and requirements from anywhere in the world at the touch of a button.” This post has been promoted to an article
  14. New lower price on 9,000-mile first service Average maintenance cost reduction of 37% on entire sports car range Price cuts on Lotus consumables including filters, plugs, drive belts and fluids Servicing schedules and job times also realigned for further running cost reductions (Hethel, UK – 23 March 2020) – Lotus has slashed the price of servicing an Elise, Exige or Evora, with annual maintenance work now starting from just £270 depending on the model. The initiative is now live at every one of the UK’s 27 Lotus retailers and service centres, and applies to all versions of the Elise, Exige and Evora. Coupled with improved residual values, it means lower running costs and improved value for money for current and future Lotus customers. It means the price of the first service (9,000 miles or one year) on a Lotus Elise Sport 220 – the best-selling version – has been cut from £554 to just £270. Across all three current models the average first service cost has been reduced by 37%. Almost 50 regular servicing components have had their prices reduced, including filters, plugs, drive belts and fluids. In addition, Lotus has also simplified the servicing schedules and realigned servicing job times for each car. Together these initiatives mean lower running costs during the entire ownership period. Lotus’ whole life running costs are already among the best in the sports car sector, as data from industry analyst CAP proves. Residual values on a three-year-old Lotus Elise Cup 220 jumped up 8%, to 56%, between Q2 and Q4 2019. Figures for a Lotus Evora GT410 Sport rose by a staggering 15%, also to 56%, during the same period. Chris Hinks, Director of Aftersales, Lotus, commented: “This change is fantastic news for our customers, who can now benefit from the servicing expertise of a Lotus retailer for even less money. We’re driving down the cost of ownership and saving people money.” The initiative could be rolled out in other global markets in due course.
  15. New lower price on 9,000-mile first service Average maintenance cost reduction of 37% on entire sports car range Price cuts on Lotus consumables including filters, plugs, drive belts and fluids Servicing schedules and job times also realigned for further running cost reductions (Hethel, UK – 23 March 2020) – Lotus has slashed the price of servicing an Elise, Exige or Evora, with annual maintenance work now starting from just £270 depending on the model. The initiative is now live at every one of the UK’s 27 Lotus retailers and service centres, and applies to all versions of the Elise, Exige and Evora. Coupled with improved residual values, it means lower running costs and improved value for money for current and future Lotus customers. It means the price of the first service (9,000 miles or one year) on a Lotus Elise Sport 220 – the best-selling version – has been cut from £554 to just £270. Across all three current models the average first service cost has been reduced by 37%. Almost 50 regular servicing components have had their prices reduced, including filters, plugs, drive belts and fluids. In addition, Lotus has also simplified the servicing schedules and realigned servicing job times for each car. Together these initiatives mean lower running costs during the entire ownership period. Lotus’ whole life running costs are already among the best in the sports car sector, as data from industry analyst CAP proves. Residual values on a three-year-old Lotus Elise Cup 220 jumped up 8%, to 56%, between Q2 and Q4 2019. Figures for a Lotus Evora GT410 Sport rose by a staggering 15%, also to 56%, during the same period. Chris Hinks, Director of Aftersales, Lotus, commented: “This change is fantastic news for our customers, who can now benefit from the servicing expertise of a Lotus retailer for even less money. We’re driving down the cost of ownership and saving people money.” The initiative could be rolled out in other global markets in due course. This post has been promoted to an article
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