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  1. Today
  2. Allon white have always been recommended for trimming. I've never used them personally, but worth a try given they are a Lotus approved Service Centre too.
  3. Nice one buddy. Get signed up to some events [emoji106]. Also have a Facebook group under SC:UK if you do an intro on there Matt Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  4. Thanks Matt, i've joined up, any excuse to get out driving.
  5. Yesterday
  6. The foam in the back of both of my seats has disintegrated. The leather and fabric are as new. Has anybody replaced their foam? Suppliers etc? Cheers!
  7. Last week
  8. Removing seats isn't too hard. Hard with the roof on! Four socket screws in the base of each seat. Slightly tricky access for some of them but an allen key will do it easily enough. They might be threadlocked so tough to get started. Be very careful putting them back not to cross-thread them. Start them by hand and they should go in fairly easily. Undo the seat belt attachment on the door side and lift the seat out. Or leave the seatbelts attached but you won't get the seats very far. Remember the order of the various washers. Carpets on your car I'm not sure, but OEM ones won't be hard to take out. Mostly velcro and one fastener. Might want to leave any sill carpet in place. There's some variations with the model year.
  9. Cant you buy a dehumidifier instead?
  10. Hi, I need to take the seats and carpets out of my S2 Elise tomorrow to dry it out. Is this a simple job? Anything I need to be aware of?
  11. Hi, I can now confirm our seasonal opening hours, as follows: Up to and inc 23rd: Normal Hours Christmas Eve: 9.00am – 1.00pm Christmas Day: Closed Boxing Day: Closed Sunday 27th December: Closed Monday28th December: Closed Tuesday 29th December: Normal Hours Wednesday 30th December: Normal Hours New Year’s Eve: 9.00am – 1.00pm New Year’s Day: Closed Saturday 2nd January: 9.00am – 1.00pm Sunday 3rd January: 10.00am – 2.00pm Monday 4th January: Normal Hours Regards Dan.
  12. This is where the differences start to appear, the FSE will give repair advice or consent to a return to factory return for remediation. I have stated that the repair process is irrelevant to my rejection, though I can see how it is relevant to resolution between the retailer and Lotus. Once I formalised matters, the retailer has been engaging and communication has been solid. I've had Zero comms from Lotus and I have seen correspondence involving senior Lotus management. It would seem that the noise/creaking from the bulkhead requires a fairly substantial strip and rebuild ( i.e clam, windscreen removal - but I am speculating to an extent here ?if it is the chassis). After two dash removals Lotus would not authorise any further repair without an FSE visit, which is understandable, but not a 4-6week wait. Some of the other issues have no repair agreed, for example there is no part number for one of the items that requires replacing and it will need to be completed in a bodyshop. One aspect that amazes me still, unless a matter is a safety related, Lotus retailers/repairers are to only respond to warranty fixes if the customer raises the matter - so zero ability to be pro-active.
  13. Well that's progress at least Adam - so what is the FSE going to look at exactly, if some of the issues have been rectified?
  14. Hi Pete, It was collected yesterday. The supplying dealer is essentially attempting to back their risk off to Lotus, which isn't unreasonable, but ultimately my contract is with the dealer. So next step is the FSE visit. I do expect a push at some stage to accept a return, but all parties are clear on my expectations and I know Lotus are in receipt of the rejection correspondence which has lots of detail.
  15. PJT

    Evora 3months on

    Hi Adam, How did the return go? What resistance did you get when you asked for a full refund? I hope you can resolve this without too much extra aggravation.
  16. Project BattCon is a pilot project introducing containerised battery test facilities Designed to help meet increasing demand for new UK-based battery testing to support EV supply chain and OEMs Containers will be in operation at Lotus HQ in Hethel, Norfolk, plus the new Lotus Advanced Technology Centre in Wellesbourne, West Midlands Provides fast, cost-effective and efficient solution for companies developing new batteries (Hethel, UK – 19 November 2020) – Lotus Engineering is launching a pilot containerised battery testing facility to assess energy storage solutions for the booming EV sector. It will allow Lotus Engineering to carry out various battery cell, module and pack characterisation tests, performance evaluations, and component and lifetime testing under controlled conditions. Early feasibility study support and validation of mature designs for implementation into new vehicles will also be available. The project has been named BattCon, an abbreviation of Battery Containerised Test Facility. The ‘containers’ are individual walk-in laboratories and will be in operation at Lotus HQ in Hethel, Norfolk, as well as the new Lotus Advanced Technology Centre in Wellesbourne, West Midlands. Each is the size of a standard 40ft shipping container and so can easily be packed up and transported as a mobile testing unit, available to Lotus Engineering customers wherever they are. Lotus has three operational units as part of the pilot scheme. For clients, Lotus Engineering will offer an EV safety-compliant workshop facility with specialist staff experienced in testing batteries. Companies new to the EV field, and those who would otherwise need to invest in additional test facilities, will have access to a fast, efficient and cost-effective solution to develop new technologies and speed up their route to market. For Lotus itself, the new technology will support ambitious plans to launch a new range of performance vehicles. Lotus Engineering has a wealth of experience in the design and engineering of EVs and other alternative propulsion powertrains dating back two decades. While many of the programmes remain confidential, the consultancy’s work on the Tesla Roadster (2008-12) is the best-known example. Matt Windle, Executive Director, Engineering, Lotus, commented: “As the race intensifies for automotive and other sectors to develop new and novel battery technologies, there will be increased demand for suitable testing facilities. Project BattCon begins to address this problem by evaluating how Lotus Engineering can meet the battery testing opportunities for the UK supply chain and OEMs.” Services available include capacity determination, resistance mapping, current and power mapping, open circuit voltage determination and heat capacity. Lifetime testing is comprised of low-voltage cycling, high-voltage cycling, self-discharge determination, storage ageing, cycle ageing, drive cycle ageing and orientation. One of the three Lotus containers features an ambient chamber, the temperature of which can be raised or lowered to replicate climatic extremes around the world. The pilot project will conclude in spring 2021 and is co-funded by the Automotive Transformation Fund (ATF), part of the Advanced Propulsion Centre (APC); Innovate UK, part of UK Research and Innovation; the UK Government’s Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and the Department for International Trade (DIT). Upon completion, the project will be evaluated and a decision taken about its future. Lotus Engineering is the consultancy division of Lotus and provides a comprehensive range of technical services to many of the world’s best-known automotive manufacturers and suppliers. In 2020 it is celebrating 40 years since it was formally incorporated.
  17. Project BattCon is a pilot project introducing containerised battery test facilities Designed to help meet increasing demand for new UK-based battery testing to support EV supply chain and OEMs Containers will be in operation at Lotus HQ in Hethel, Norfolk, plus the new Lotus Advanced Technology Centre in Wellesbourne, West Midlands Provides fast, cost-effective and efficient solution for companies developing new batteries (Hethel, UK – 19 November 2020) – Lotus Engineering is launching a pilot containerised battery testing facility to assess energy storage solutions for the booming EV sector. It will allow Lotus Engineering to carry out various battery cell, module and pack characterisation tests, performance evaluations, and component and lifetime testing under controlled conditions. Early feasibility study support and validation of mature designs for implementation into new vehicles will also be available. The project has been named BattCon, an abbreviation of Battery Containerised Test Facility. The ‘containers’ are individual walk-in laboratories and will be in operation at Lotus HQ in Hethel, Norfolk, as well as the new Lotus Advanced Technology Centre in Wellesbourne, West Midlands. Each is the size of a standard 40ft shipping container and so can easily be packed up and transported as a mobile testing unit, available to Lotus Engineering customers wherever they are. Lotus has three operational units as part of the pilot scheme. For clients, Lotus Engineering will offer an EV safety-compliant workshop facility with specialist staff experienced in testing batteries. Companies new to the EV field, and those who would otherwise need to invest in additional test facilities, will have access to a fast, efficient and cost-effective solution to develop new technologies and speed up their route to market. For Lotus itself, the new technology will support ambitious plans to launch a new range of performance vehicles. Lotus Engineering has a wealth of experience in the design and engineering of EVs and other alternative propulsion powertrains dating back two decades. While many of the programmes remain confidential, the consultancy’s work on the Tesla Roadster (2008-12) is the best-known example. Matt Windle, Executive Director, Engineering, Lotus, commented: “As the race intensifies for automotive and other sectors to develop new and novel battery technologies, there will be increased demand for suitable testing facilities. Project BattCon begins to address this problem by evaluating how Lotus Engineering can meet the battery testing opportunities for the UK supply chain and OEMs.” Services available include capacity determination, resistance mapping, current and power mapping, open circuit voltage determination and heat capacity. Lifetime testing is comprised of low-voltage cycling, high-voltage cycling, self-discharge determination, storage ageing, cycle ageing, drive cycle ageing and orientation. One of the three Lotus containers features an ambient chamber, the temperature of which can be raised or lowered to replicate climatic extremes around the world. The pilot project will conclude in spring 2021 and is co-funded by the Automotive Transformation Fund (ATF), part of the Advanced Propulsion Centre (APC); Innovate UK, part of UK Research and Innovation; the UK Government’s Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and the Department for International Trade (DIT). Upon completion, the project will be evaluated and a decision taken about its future. Lotus Engineering is the consultancy division of Lotus and provides a comprehensive range of technical services to many of the world’s best-known automotive manufacturers and suppliers. In 2020 it is celebrating 40 years since it was formally incorporated. This post has been promoted to an article
  18. thanks Timbo - im very grateful for your kind assistance
  19. Echo what Dave just said! Gutted to hear your sorry tale, Adam. Good luck 🤞 with getting acceptable resolution tomorrow
  20. Lotus should be replacing your car or refunding your money (your choice) in very short order, in my view. When things are this bad they need to go overboard to restore the faith in their customer service, the quality of the product, and to avoid reputational impact. I’m not saying you would, or suggesting it, but it wouldn’t take much for someone in your shoes to get on all the social media apps/channels and tear strips off them, posting photos galore and describing the issues in detail. Imagine the impact on people’s views of Lotus as a brand, just when they are trying to go upmarket and steal customers from the likes of Porsche, Aston etc. Come on Lotus, get your act together, this is neither difficult nor expensive to resolve in the grand scheme of things.
  21. I'll avoid naming the dealer for now Dave, the Evora was supplied with 340 miles on the clock. It was built for the FD of Lotus who departed weeks after receiving the car hence the low miles. I know what the outcome would be if I produced something of equivalent quality for my FD. Andy is the FSE who is unable to travel due to Covid restrictions, I was prepared to leave it for over 72hrs before inspection etc, but no, I need to wait at least 4 weeks before any further repairs are approved.
  22. That’s absolutely shocking. Which dealer did you buy it from? I presume you’ve spoken to Andy French at the factory (boss of customer relations last time I spoke to him, years ago)..
  23. Its definitely dented my trust and I've a few friends with german cars giving me the "I told you so"! I think I am in for a long few months, but I've made my expectations clear and I do believe I've been more than fair. Its been in for repair 3 times for >20 of the 90 days I have owned it a alongside been unusable for a further 14days. I can live with odds bits of trim taking longer than they should to arrive. But not the alarm going off incessantly for the first 7days of ownership, water ingress resulting in a stale and smelly interior, unresolved body/chassis issues including the whole dash being removed twice and more recent mechanical issues. I've had over ten individual issues in 700miles. No replacement vehicles and an offer to swap out for the same model went unanswered. A suggested solution was for it to go back to factory to have various elements rebuilt and a full QA check. Price point is an issue for sure with all above needing the context of price point of £72k. I thought it would be amazing to own an an essentially new lotus, now I will be pleased not to look at it on the drive after 1030am tomorrow. I'd even started to doubt what was a fault and what was in my mind I do feel like I am being disloyal to a brand I am passionate about, but Lotus can only continue to exist if people buy new/nearly new cars. Build, sales and factory support have simply not been good enough.
  24. That is a real shame. Not sure what's going on at Lotus then, but it looks like quality control has, unfortunately, gone through the floor. I've had my Evora N/A Sports Racer from new and it'll be six years old next March. And even though I was a bit of a serial Lotus buyer for several (aka, lots of) years prior to my current Evora and Elise S (220) pairing, I haven't once felt like I needed to change either of them. They're both outstanding examples of Lotus at their best, so it really is saddening to hear horror stories like yours. Hope you manage to get your Lotus mojo back at some point.
  25. Sorry to hear about your Evora problems Adam, shame becasue the 410 is an real beauty TBH though if I was looking for an Evora I think I would be looking at an older/cheaper NA car with near zero depreciation - 90% of the fun for less than 50% of the cost
  26. Some of it was nativity on my part, certainly as far as the idle goes as my Elise gets used for holidays which can lead to lots of town driving. Other than that there were paint issues, flaking and micro blisters and an oil leak that the dealer just couldn’t seem to fix. I wanted to love it but ended up falling out of love with it. It happened to be a 160 but could have been any model, but things like that tend to cloud your judgement hence my comment above. I appreciate the 160 is considered to be the Elise holy grail but that’s how it left me feeling, just a bad experience which I decided to cut my losses with👍 Quite a few years ago now, every issue meant a trip to central Birmingham to get it sorted/looked at or the Lotus field engineer check it out... just a pita and just unlucky I guess. Sorry to hear of the o/p’s issues it’s a really shitty situation to be in when you’ve spent so much money.
  27. What was wrong with the 160? Most people who don’t “get” them often bemoan the lumpy idle and you have to drive around the kangarooing at low speeds because of the aggressive timing overlap, but did you have some other issues as well?
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